Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Philadelphia National Cemetery

 
 
Philadelphia National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2019
1. Philadelphia National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
Civil War Philadelphia
At the time of the Civil War, Philadelphia was the second-largest American city. Its factories supported the Union war effort by producing everything from blankets to gunboats. In less than three months, its navy yards produced the sloop-of-war U.S.S. Tuscarora. The ironclad U.S.S. New Ironsides, which saw action at Charleston, South Carolina, and at Fort Fisher and Wilmington, North Carolina, was also built in Philadelphia shipyards.

Thousands of Union soldiers passed through the city on the way to the front. Local organizations provided lodging, food, laundry, and bathing facilities. Later, the city opened hospitals for soldiers, as did the federal government. Ailing troops were treated at Broad Street, Christian Street, Citizens Volunteer, Cuyler, Haddington, Islington Lane, McClellan, Officer, South Street, Summit House, and Turner's Lane hospitals.

Satterlee and Mower hospitals were the largest. Satterlee General Hospital, opened 1862, could accommodate 3,000 patients. Mower General Hospital, opened 1863, held 4,000 patients. During the war more than 157,000 soldiers, sailors,
Marker detail: Ward in Union Volunteer Hospital, a private hospital in Philadelphia, c. 1862 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
2. Marker detail: Ward in Union Volunteer Hospital, a private hospital in Philadelphia, c. 1862
and Confederate prisoners were treated in Philadelphia hospitals. Many died from disease or wounds.

National Cemetery
The dead were initially buried in several locations that collectively made up the original Philadelphia National Cemetery. The War Department maintained lots in seven city cemeteries —Glenwood, Lafayette, Lebanon, Mount Moriah, Odd-Fellows, United American Mechanics, and Woodlands. Lots in Rural Cemetery in Chester, and Whitehall and Bristol cemeteries, also received military burials. By the early 1880s, Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs chose to consolidate these dead into a single national cemetery. After the War Department acquired more than 13 acres in northwest Philadelphia in 1885, an estimated 1,500 Union and Confederate remains were reinterred here.

The cemetery was designed in the rural style. Curving roads and generous plantings created a park-like environment. A large Italianate house acquired with the property served as the superintendent's residence for fifty years. It was razed in 1934.

Medal of Honor Recipient
One Civil War recipient of the Medal of Honor is buried in the cemetery: Gen. Galusha Pennypacker, 97th Pennsylvania Infantry.

First bestowed in 1863, it is the highest award for military valor in the U.S. Armed Services. For acts above and beyond the call of duty, 1,522 individuals
Marker detail: View of cemetery entrance, 1903 & 2019  the gate was replaced in 1940 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration (1903 photograph)
3. Marker detail: View of cemetery entrance, 1903 & 2019 the gate was replaced in 1940
who served in the Civil War received the medal. Pennypacker earned it for bravery in the January 1865 assault on Fort Fisher, North Carolina. Afterward he was promoted, and at 20 became the youngest Union general. He died in 1916 (Officers Section, Grave 175).
 
Erected by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Cemeteries marker series.
 
Location. 40° 3.506′ N, 75° 9.274′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Limekiln Pike and Haines Street (69th Avenue). Marker is located within the Philadelphia National Cemetery grounds, near the center of the cemetery, overlooking the Officers Section. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6909 Limekiln Pike, Philadelphia PA 19138, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S.C.T. Burials in the National Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Mexican-American War Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A National Cemetery System (about 400 feet away); In The Battle of Germantown (about 400 feet away); Address by President Lincoln
Marker detail: Gen. Galusha Pennypacker. History of the Ninety-Seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, 1875 image. Click for full size.
June 25, 2019
4. Marker detail: Gen. Galusha Pennypacker. History of the Ninety-Seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, 1875
Civil War Army Medal of Honor.
Gettysburg National Military Park.
(about 400 feet away); Confederate Burials in the National Cemetery (about 400 feet away); Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument (about 500 feet away); Village of La Mott (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Philadelphia National Cemetery
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Galusha Pennypacker Headstone<br>(<i>located about 20 feet northwest of the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2019
5. Galusha Pennypacker Headstone
(located about 20 feet northwest of the marker)
Medal of Honor
Maj. Gen.
Galusha Pennypacker
U.S.A.
1844-1916
Philadelphia National Cemetery Marker (<i>wide view  Pennypacker headstone behind, to the left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2019
6. Philadelphia National Cemetery Marker (wide view Pennypacker headstone behind, to the left)
 

More. Search the internet for Philadelphia National Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on July 10, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on July 10, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 18, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Paid Advertisement