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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Circleville in Pickaway County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Chief Logan / Logan Elm

 
 
Chief Logan Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2008
1. Chief Logan Marker
Inscription.
Side A:
Chief Logan

Tah-gah-jute, the Mingo chief named Logan, was a native of Pennsylvania. Logan moved to Ohio in 1770, and settled at the Pickaway Plains. Logan and his father, Shikellimus, had long supported friendships between Native Americans and white men; however, in the spring of 1774, his tribesmen and family were murdered at Yellow Creek, along the Ohio River. Once an advocate of peace, Logan went on the warpath and raided frontier settlements. These and similar raids along the Ohio frontier precipitated Lord Dunmore's War in October 1774. After the Shawnees and their allies were defeated at Point Pleasant, Virginia governor Lord Dunmore marched up the Hocking River to the Pickaway Plains. Dunmore asked his interpreter, Colonel John Gibson, to assist in negotiations with Cornstalk and other Indian leaders, including Logan. Logan declined to attend the conference, but spoke to Gibson about his anger and betrayal.

Side B:
Logan Elm

It was here under a large elm tree that Chief Logan was said to have delivered his powerful speech on Indian-white relations, which Gibson delivered to Lord Dunmore at Camp Charlotte. Logan's lamentation was printed widely and appeared in newspapers in New York, Philadelphia, and Williamsburg in 1775. The speech is inscribed on
Logan Elm Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2008
2. Logan Elm Marker
the Chief Logan Monument, worded as it was related to President Thomas Jefferson. Once considered to be one of the largest elms in the United States, the 65 feet tall elm died in 1964 after being stricken with blight and damaged by storms. Through the efforts of the Ohio History Day Association, this location was dedicated as Logan Elm Park. The Ohio Historical Society currently operates the Logan Elm State Memorial.
 
Erected 2003 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Ohio, Soldiers Monumental Association of Pickaway County, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 10-65.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 30.551′ N, 82° 57.314′ W. Marker is near Circleville, Ohio, in Pickaway County. Marker is at the intersection of Ohio Route 361 and Wolfe Road on State Route 361. Touch for map. Marker is in Logan Elm State Memorial, one mile east of US Route 23, and about five miles south of Circleville. Marker is in this post office area: Circleville OH 43113, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Logan's Speech (within shouting distance of this marker); Grenadier Squaw (Non-hel-e-ma)
Chief Logan / Logan Elm Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2008
3. Chief Logan / Logan Elm Marker
Looking northwest. Other memorial markers in distance.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Cornstalk (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. Michael Cresap (within shouting distance of this marker); John Boggs Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of Logan Elm (about 300 feet away); Grenadier Squaw Village (approx. 1.5 miles away); Grenadier Squaw Village / Cornstalk Town (approx. 1.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Circleville.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansNatural ResourcesNotable PersonsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Logan Elm State Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2008
4. Logan Elm State Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 18, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,002 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 18, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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