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Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Battlefield

It's Bigger Than You Think

 
 
The Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
1. The Battlefield Marker
Inscription.  Since 2010, the Applied Anthropology Laboratories (AAL), in the Department of Anthropology at Ball State University has conducted archeology research on this battlefield with funding from the National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP). These investigations have shaped a new perspective of the battlefield. The research methods used the ABPP's KOCOA analysis (see inset), which is based on the U.S. military's process for evaluating battlefield terrain and the use of landscape in battle strategy. KOCOA was applied to the American Indian's movements in order to better understand how the American Indian alliance used the landscape to soundly route St. Clair's army.

The KOCOA analysis, coupled with artifact locations and historical research, led to expansion of the previously defined battlefield. This map shows the 787 acre expanded battlefield boundary (in green), which includes all aspects of the battle: the high ridge where the American Indians formed their strategic crescent; St. Clair's encampment; and the area of St. Clair's retreat to the southeast. The pink jagged line represents the possible path that
The Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
2. The Battlefield Marker
Close-up view of the satellite photo map that is displayed on this marker. The caption reads as follows: Map of the Battlefield.
the estimated 1,400 American Indians from nine different tribes could have taken to surround St. Clair's army's in 15 minutes, with the least possibility of being visible to the U.S. forces of approximately 1,000 soldiers.

"It was but a few minutes, however, until the men were engaged in every quarter. The enemy from the front filed off to the right and left, and completely surrounded the camps, killed and cut off nearly all the guards, and approached close to the line."
-From the Military Journal of Major Ebenezer Denny
 
Erected by National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program and the State of Ohio. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Location. 40° 24.858′ N, 84° 46.918′ W. Marker is in Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is on Fort Site Street near West Boundary Street, on the right when traveling south. This marker is located along the "Fort Recovery Battlefield Walking Tour." More specifically, it is situated along the walking path that is found behind the Fort Recovery Museum, in the park that is part of the state historic site. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Fort Site Street, Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. American Indian Tribes (here, next to this marker); On Christmas Day 1793
The Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
3. The Battlefield Marker
View of the marker looking east along the park walking path.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Fort Recovery (within shouting distance of this marker); On This Triangle of Land. (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Wabash River (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Wabash (Ouabache) River (about 300 feet away); Native Cultures (about 300 feet away); Battle of the Wabash (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
The Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
4. The Battlefield Marker
View of the marker looking west along the park walking path.
 

More. Search the internet for The Battlefield.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 14, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 5, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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