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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Colonial Column

 
 
Colonial Column Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
1. Colonial Column Marker
Viewing south towards marker.
Inscription.  This column was erected in 1901 at Guilford Courthouse National Military Park as a testament to the Battle of Alamance being the "first battle of the American Revolution." But as early as 1937, the National Park Service questioned the appropriateness at the military park. Once Alamance Battlefield State Historic Site opened, it deemed a more fitting location for the monument. Moving it involved negotiations between the U.S. Department of the Interior, State of North Carolina, and descendants of James Hunter. It arrived here in 1962 amd is on indefinite loan.

Research has shown that the plaque dedicated to James Hunter is inaccurate because it provides information on two different James Hunters. Evidence indicates that James Hunter of Stinking Quarter and Sandy Creek was the Regulator leader. He did not have a connection with the Hunter family from Beaver Island Creek.

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This article describes the transfer of the Colonial Column to Alamance Battlefield in the October 9, 1962 edition of The Daily Times-News.

The Colonial Column in its original location at Guilford Courthouse Military
Colonial Column Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
2. Colonial Column Marker
Viewing south towards marker.
Park.

N.C. Highway Historical Marker located near Regulator leader James Hunter's plantation of Sandy Creek. The marker is located approximately 10 miles north from Alamance Battlefield in Julian, North Carolina at the intersection of N.C. Highway 62 and old U.S. 421.

This article about the Fourth of July unveiling of the column as reported in The Greensboro Patriot on July 10, 1901.

This display was made possible by the Alamance Battleground Friends and the Alamance Long Rifles.
 
Erected by The Alamance Battleground Friends and the Alamance Long Rifles.
 
Location. 36° 0.487′ N, 79° 31.208′ W. Marker is in Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 62 and Clapp Mill Road, on the right when traveling east on State Highway 62. Marker is in a clump of trees near "The Battle of Alamance" monument. which is also known as the "Colonial Column" monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burlington NC 27215, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of the Alamance (a few steps from this marker); First Battle of the Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Alamance Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct
Five of the markers and monuments in the immediate area. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
3. Five of the markers and monuments in the immediate area.
Viewing south towards markers and monuments.
line); Battle of Alamance (about 300 feet away); Governor Tryon and the Militia (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Alamance (about 400 feet away); The Regulators' Field (about 500 feet away); Pugh's Rock (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
Also see . . .  Alamance Battleground. North Carolina Historic Sites (Submitted on September 18, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
4. The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column.
Viewing south towards monument.
The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
5. The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column.
Viewing monument towards the west.
The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
6. The Battle of Alamance Monument. Also known as the Colonial Column.
Viewing east towards the monument.
 

More. Search the internet for Colonial Column.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 19, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2019. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 18, 2019. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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