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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Paris in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson’s Bivouac

 
 
Jackson's Bivouac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2007
1. Jackson's Bivouac Marker
Inscription. After a day’s march from Winchester on 19-20 July 1861, Brig. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson halted his lead brigade of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Valley army near here. At 2:00 A.M. his 2,500 men sank down to rest. When told that no sentries had been posted, Jackson stated “Let the poor boys sleep. I will guard the camp myself.” Relieved of his duty an hour before daybreak, Jackson slept briefly, rising at dawn to march to Piedmont Station (now Delaplane), where railcars waited to transport the 11,000-man army to Manassas Junction. There, nearly 30,000 Confederates faced 35,000 Federals at the First Battle of Manassas.
 
Erected 1996 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number B 20.)
 
Location. 39° 0.305′ N, 77° 57.027′ W. Marker is in Paris, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of John Mosby Highway (County Route 17/50) and Federal Street (Virginia Route 759), on the right when traveling east on John Mosby Highway. Touch for map. The marker is just at the exit lane off Highway 17/50 for Federal Street. Marker is in this post office area: Paris VA 20130, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow
Jackson's Bivouac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 16, 2007
2. Jackson's Bivouac Marker
flies. Clark County / Fauquier County (approx. 0.9 miles away); Ashby’s Gap (approx. 1.2 miles away); Signal Station (approx. 1.2 miles away but has been reported missing); Mount Bleak Farm (approx. 1.2 miles away); Mt. Carmel Fight (approx. 2.5 miles away); Lee Moves North Again (approx. 3.2 miles away); Battle of Upperville (approx. 3.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Upperville (approx. 3.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This marker replaces a marker with the same number and title but with shorter text dating from the late 1920s or 1930s. The text of that marker read “Near here Jackson’s mens, going to First Manassas, sank down to rest, July 19, 1861, without placing pickets. Jackson said ‘Let the poor fellows sleep, I will guard the camp myself.’ ” —Ed.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Sign at farm in Paris repeats the text of the highway marker image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, September 8, 2007
3. Sign at farm in Paris repeats the text of the highway marker
Bordering the town of Paris is a farm with this marker affixed to the fence, about a quarter mile away.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,707 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on September 9, 2007, by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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