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Beaver in Beaver County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Philo T. Farnsworth

 
 
Philo T. Farnsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 20, 2007
1. Philo T. Farnsworth Marker
Inscription. Philo Taylor Farnsworth was born August 19, 1906 in a log cabin near Beaver, Utah. At an early age, he became familiar with the various components of the telephone and the gramaphone. By age 12, he had a thorough understanding of electronics. In 1922, at age 15, now living in Rigby, Idaho, he developed the concept of the electronic transmission of images, and drew mathematical diagrams to show how this could be done.

In 1927, in San Francisco, California, after having invented and developed numerous vacuum tubes, such as the image dissector which the statue is holding, he was able to transmit and receive a recognizable image.

In 1934, after demonstrating that his ideas of electronic image transmission were the first to be written down, he was issued patents regarding television methods that are still used in every television receiving set, television camera, and transmitter manufactured in the United States as well as abroad.

He was issued over 170 patents regarding electronic inventions, most of which were designed for television. In addition, he also developed the first electron microscope, baby incubator, and medical gastroscope. He pioneered electronic infrared surveillance scopes used in World War Two and ever since. He developed memory vacuum tubes for radar screens, air traffic control, and underwater
Philo T. Farnsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 16, 2014
2. Philo T. Farnsworth Marker
sonar devices. At the time of his death, he had developed cold cathode-ray tubes that are used in the television and computer industries, and working in cold nuclear fusion.

Philo T. Farnswroth, “The Father of Television,” died March 14, 1971, in Holliday, Utah, a suburb of Salt Lake City.
 
Erected 1993 by Beaver City and Beaver Travel Council.
 
Location. 38° 16.439′ N, 112° 38.398′ W. Marker is in Beaver, Utah, in Beaver County. Marker is on Center Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 64 E Center Street, Beaver UT 84713, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Beaver Territorial Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); Beaver Opera House (within shouting distance of this marker); Beaver Relief Society Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Beaver Stake Tabernacle (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Cameron (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Beaver.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The list includes other historical markers about Philo T. Farnsworth in California and Indiana.
 
Also see . . .
Philo T. Farnsworth<br>by James Avati image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 20, 2007
3. Philo T. Farnsworth
by James Avati
This 7½ foot full-length portrait of Philo T. Farnsworth in bronze was created by the sculptor James R. Avati in 1990. He received a Masters of Fine Arts Degree from the University of Utah in 1988.
 The Farnsworth Archives. This site has a thumbnail biography. (Submitted on July 8, 2007.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Philo T. Farnsworth (1806–1971)<br>“Father of Television” image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen
4. Philo T. Farnsworth (1806–1971)
“Father of Television”
Marker at base of statue image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 20, 2007
5. Marker at base of statue
Detail of statue image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 20, 2007
6. Detail of statue
Philo T. Farnsworth Statue in the U.S. Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 21, 2016
7. Philo T. Farnsworth Statue in the U.S. Capitol
An earlier version of this statue was given to the U.S. Capitol by the State of Utah in 1990. It stands in the Visitors Center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 24, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,254 times since then and 138 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week July 24, 2016. Photos:   1. submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on July 21, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 28, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on July 17, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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