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Alpine in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lower Closter or New Dock

Huyler’s Landing

 
 
Lower Closter or New Dock Marker (East Side of Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2019
1. Lower Closter or New Dock Marker (East Side of Marker)
Inscription.  
Lower Closter or New Dock
Here a British invasion force of 5,000 troops commanded by Lord Cornwallis landed before dawn on November 20, 1776. Guided by three Bergen County residents, Joseph Hawkins, Isaac Perkins, and John Aldington, they climbed the rough road to the top of the cliffs and marched south to capture Fort Lee. At sunrise, Lt. John Clifford of Heard’s Brigade, New Jersey State Troops, saw them, commandeered a horse, and alerted the garrison at Fort Lee. About 3,000 soldiers, led by Generals George Washington and Nathanael Greene, retreated over the Hackensack River at New Bridge on their route to the relative safety of Pennsylvania. This landing place was used in later raids and finally blocked with felled trees in 1780.
Sponsored by the Bergen County Historical Society, 2019

Huyler’s Landing
From colonial times, local farmers brought their harvests down a steep road they built through a natural break in the cliffs to the dock here for shipping to New York City markets. After Peter Huyler improved the road and dock about 1840, this place became known as Huyler’s Landing. Through
Lower Closter or New Dock Marker (West Side of Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2019
2. Lower Closter or New Dock Marker (West Side of Marker)
the 1870s, a multiracial, multiethnic community of boatmen, ship-builders, fishermen, quarrymen, and their families lived and labored here. Sloops, steamboats, and smaller vessels transported people, firewood, farm goods, fish, and stone between Huyler’s Landing and ports along the Hudson. A few residents remained into the early twentieth century, after the Interstate Park Commission acquired the land.
Sponsored by the Bergen County Historical Society, 2019

 
Erected 2019 by Bergen County Historical Society.
 
Location. 40° 55.605′ N, 73° 55.5′ W. Marker is in Alpine, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Marker can be reached from Henry Hudson Drive, on the left when traveling south. Marker is located in the Palisades Interstate Park, at the intersection of the red blazed Huyler’s Landing Trail and the blue blazed Long Path. It is not accessible by car. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alpine NJ 07620, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rionda’s Tower (approx. 0.6 miles away); Along the Palisades Riverfront (approx. 1.4 miles away); Cornwallis Headquarters (approx. 1.4 miles away); The Old Alpine Trail (approx. 1.4 miles away); Untangling Folklore from Fact
Lower Closter or New Dock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2019
3. Lower Closter or New Dock Marker
(approx. 1½ miles away); Closter Dock Road (approx. 1½ miles away); Everett – Dunn House (approx. 1.7 miles away); Cap’t John Huyler’s Farm (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alpine.
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Huyler’s Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2019
4. Huyler’s Landing Marker
Lower Closter or New Dock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 10, 2019
5. Lower Closter or New Dock Marker
The trail used by the British Army in 1776, and later by the residents of Huyler's Landing can be seen behind the marker.
 

More. Search the internet for Lower Closter or New Dock.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2019, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 10, 2019, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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