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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Willington in Tolland County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

This Edifice

 
 
This Edifice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 10, 2007
1. This Edifice Marker
Inscription. 1727–1727. This edifice originally a Meeting House was donated by the Wilington Ecclesiastical Society to the Town of Willington for the use of the public and to perpetuate the memory of the forefathers and foremothers who with Christian fortitude endured the hardships of the wilderness to found a town and to establish a church.
 
Erected 1927 by Wilington Ecclesiastical Society.
 
Location. 41° 52.565′ N, 72° 15.814′ W. Marker is in Willington, Connecticut, in Tolland County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Connecticut Route 74 and Connecticut Route 320. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Willington CT 06279, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Town of Willington, Connecticut (within shouting distance of this marker); Willington (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Willington (approx. 2.4 miles away); Constitution Oak (approx. 7.2 miles away); Ashford (approx. 7.2 miles away); Captain Nathan Hale Monument
Meeting House image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 10, 2007
2. Meeting House
Marker is over the front door.
(approx. 7.8 miles away); Mansfield (approx. 8.2 miles away); a different marker also named Constitution Oak (approx. 10.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Willington.
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
The bell in front of the meeting house image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 10, 2007
3. The bell in front of the meeting house
Bell Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 10, 2007
4. Bell Tablet
In 1876 this bell was bought from the First Congregational Church of Stafford for $140 and hung in the belfry of the new meeting house. In 1942 the bell rested in the entry when the tower was used as an observation post in World War II. On July 4, 1973 the bell pedestal was dedicated by the townspeople.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 11, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,288 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 11, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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