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Keedysville in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Keedysville

Headquarters and Hospital Town

 

—Antietam Campaign 1862 —

 
Keedysville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 9, 2007
1. Keedysville Marker
Inscription. After the Battle of South Mountain ended around nightfall on September 14, 1862, many Confederates marched by here. The next day, Gen. George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac arrived, and McClellan established his headquarters here in the German Reformed Church. The army bivouacked in and around Keedysville before it attacked Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia near Sharpsburg on September 17. After the battle, the bloodiest day in American history, Keedysville became one vast Union hospital. Here Capt. Oliver Wendell Homes, Jr., son of the poet and future justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, received treatment for his neck wound. Keedysville hosted Federal troops for several weeks thereafter.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 29.287′ N, 77° 41.916′ W. Marker is in Keedysville, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Taylor Drive and North Main Street (Maryland Route 845), in the median on Taylor Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Keedysville MD 21756, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hess’s Mill Bridge (approx.
Keedysville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 9, 2007
2. Keedysville Marker
0.2 miles away); Keedysville District World War II Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Keedysville World War I Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Keedysville Korea & Vietnam Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pry’s Mill Bridge (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hitt Bridge (approx. 0.8 miles away); Pry Mill (approx. 0.8 miles away); Civil War Hospital Site (approx. 0.8 miles away); Hitt-Cost House (approx. 0.9 miles away); Felfoot Bridge (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Keedysville.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays two pictures. The main picture is of Keedysville in the 19th century, captioned, This photograph of Keedysville was taken from a range of hills overlooking the valley between the Antietam and South Mountain battlefields. Boonsboro and South Mountain can be seen in the background.

The smaller is a drawing of the church, captioned, The German Reformed Church was used as a hospital after the battle.
The Reform Church as Reconstructed image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
3. The Reform Church as Reconstructed
The reconstructed church stands on South Main Street in Keedysville. The cornerstone of the church details the original construction date of 1852 and the reconstruction in 1892.

 
Also see . . .
1. German Reform Church. Currently the Mount Vernon Reformed Church, of the United Church of Christ denomination. The original church had begun to collapse due to structural damage from the war. Not from canon or fighting, but rather foundation damage from a hole dug outside to bury amputated limbs. (Submitted on July 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Biography. (Submitted on July 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Civil War Photographs of Hospitals in Keedysville. Links 314 and 319 are photographs from the Civil War of hospitals around Keedysville. (Submitted on July 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. History of Keedysville. (Submitted on August 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,904 times since then and 216 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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