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Comus in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mt. Ephraim Crossroads

Sharpshooters Hold the Line

 

—Antietam Campaign 1862 —

 
Mt. Ephraim Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 29, 2007
1. Mt. Ephraim Crossroads Marker
Inscription. You are looking at Sugarloaf Mountain, where the running cavalry fight that began in the late afternoon on September 9, 1862, in Barnesville came to a halt. By the next morning, the 7th and 9th Virginia Cavalry had been brought to bay here at the southern base of the mountain by the 8th Illinois and 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Both sides had been reinforced, and each had brought up artillery. Dismounted sharpshooters of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry looked down on the Federals from among the trees and rocks on the slopes of the mountain. The fighting continued throughout the day with much cannon fire. By evening neither side had budged, and one Union cavalryman had been killed and one wounded.

Early on the morning of September 11, the Confederates slipped away after brief exchanges of gunfire, also abandoning a signal station atop the mountain. As the Army of Northern Virginia was marching northwest out of Frederick, the action at Sugarloaf Mountain proved to be a successful rear guard action.

(Sidebar)

The Comus Inn was the Benjamin Johnson family farm at the time of the Civil War, and the crossroads was known as Mt. Ephraim. The family’s log cabin was added to in the 1890s. The name Comus (Roman god of revelry and son of Bacchus) was not used until a post office was established here in 1930. In the 1930s, President Franklin
Close Up of the Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
2. Close Up of the Map
D. Roosevelt wanted to acquire Sugarloaf Mountain as his presidential retreat, but the owner, Gordon Strong, refused to sell, so the president went north to Shangri-La, now Camp David.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 14.886′ N, 77° 21.01′ W. Marker is in Comus, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Old Hundred Road (Maryland Route 109) and Comus Road (Maryland Route 95), on the right when traveling south on Old Hundred Road. Touch for map. Located in the rear of a parking lot for the Comus Inn. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23900 Old Hundred Road, Dickerson MD 20842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 1862 Antietam Campaign ( a few steps from this marker); Sugarloaf Mountain ( approx. 2.3 miles away); Sugar Loaf Mountain ( approx. 2.4 miles away); Barnesville ( approx. 2.5 miles away); a different marker also named Barnesville ( approx. 2.5 miles away); Women on the Homefront in Montgomery County ( approx. 2.8 miles away); Hyattstown ( approx. 2.9 miles away); Hyattstown Mill ( approx. 3 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
The Marker with Sugarloaf Mountain in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
3. The Marker with Sugarloaf Mountain in the Background
The marker features two drawings from the war. The first is depicts J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry on their way to the Potomac River. The second is an impression of Sugarloaf Mountain, with a lot of artistic license. A map displays the unit movements pertaining to the Antietam Campaign.
 
Also see . . .  History of the Comus Inn. (Submitted on July 14, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional keywords. Antietam Campaign
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Sugarloaf Mountain from Comus Inn image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 29, 2007
4. Sugarloaf Mountain from Comus Inn
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 14, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,644 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 14, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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