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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pocahontas in Tazewell County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pocahontas

 
 
Pocahontas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 20, 2007
1. Pocahontas Marker
Inscription. This region was visited by the explorer, Dr. Thomas Walker, in 1750. Following a report by Captain I. A. Welch in 1873, the first coal mine was opened here in 1882. Shipment of coal followed in 1883, when the Norfolk and Western Railroad reached this point from Radford. First known as “Powell’s Bottom,” the town was incorporated in 1884 and named for the Indian princess Pocahontas.
 
Erected 1947 by Virginia Conservation Commission. (Marker Number XP-4.)
 
Location. 37° 18.595′ N, 81° 20.091′ W. Marker is near Pocahontas, Virginia, in Tazewell County. Marker is on Bramwell Road (County Route 644) 0 miles from Virginia Route 102, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pocahontas VA 24635, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Abb’s Valley (a few steps from this marker); Pocahontas Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Jordan Nelson’s Coal Bank (approx. 0.2 miles away in West Virginia); Town of Pocahontas Commercial District (approx. half a mile away); Pocahontas Mine No. 1
Markers on Bramwell Road image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 20, 2007
2. Markers on Bramwell Road
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Bramwell (approx. one mile away in West Virginia); Mill Creek Coal & Coke Co. (approx. one mile away in West Virginia); West Virginia / Mercer County (approx. 1.9 miles away in West Virginia). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pocahontas.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNatural ResourcesSettlements & Settlers
 
The company store image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 20, 2007
3. The company store
Abandoned business block image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 20, 2007
4. Abandoned business block
Pocahontas Exhibition Mine image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, July 20, 2007
5. Pocahontas Exhibition Mine
Pocahontas image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
6. Pocahontas
This portrait of Pocahontas (Matoaks) after a 1616 engraving by Simon van de Passe hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“Pocahontas, the Indian princess who allegedly saved the life of English colonist John Smith, survives and flourishes as an example of an early American heroine. While Smith may have embellished the story of his rescue, the importance of Pocahontas to relations between colonists and Native Americans is undisputed. Following her conversion to Christianity and marriage to Englishman John Rolfe, Pocahontas journeyed to England with her family to demonstrate the ability of new settlers and native tribes to coexist in the Virginia colony. While in England, Pocahontas sat for her portrait, which was later engraved. That print served as the basis for this later portrait …” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 22, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,461 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 22, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on October 26, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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