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Near Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cobb’s Brigade McLaw’s Division C.S.A.

Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar & Cobbs Georgia Legion

 
 
Front Side (faces Gapland Road) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 2003
1. Front Side (faces Gapland Road)
Inscription.
Cobb’s Brigade
McLaw’s Division C.S.A.

————
At 1 P.M. on September 14, 1862, Cobb’s Brigade under Gen. Howell Cobb of Athens, GA. marched from Sandy Hook to Brownsville at the west foot of South Mountain. At 4 P.M., as Cobb’s Brigade reached Brownsville, word came that the Union VI Corps, numbering 12,000 troops, was attacking Crampton’s Gap. The sole Confederate troops stationed there were Col. William A. Parham’s Brigade augmented by Col. Thomas Munford’s cavalry and the 10th Georgia Regiment of Semmes’ Brigade, roughly 800 muskets in all.

Cobb’s regiments were hurried to Parham’s aid: the 24th Georgia and 15th North Carolina ascending into the gap first, closely followed by the 16th Georgia and Col. T.R.R. Cobb’s Legion accompanied by Gen. Howell Cobb. Two guns of the Troup Artillery were also commandeered. Outnumbered 6 to 1, Cobb’s and Parham’s troops were decimated and retreated. The next morning only 300 of the Brigade’s 1300 men answered roll call.

Beaten and wounded soldiers straggled in over the next few days. Casualties for the Brigade probably exceeded 50%. The defense of Crampton’s Gap, though costly in casualties, was instrumental in forestalling the compromise of Lee’s Army due to the famous "Lost Order." Here it was that
Back Side (facing the wood line) image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
2. Back Side (facing the wood line)
Gen. George B. McClellan had elected to cut Lee in two and “beat him in detail.”

Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar
& Cobbs Georgia Legion

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Col. Thomas R.R. Cobb (brother of Howell Cobb) organized Cobb’s Legion in August 1861. The Legion consisted of 6 infantry companies, 4 cavalry companies, and the Troup Light Artillery. On September 6, 1862, the Legion, attached to Gen. Howell Cobb’s Brigade, accompanied “Stonewall” Jackson’s Corps en route to capture Harpers Ferry. Except for 2 guns, the Troup Artillery was positioned on Maryland Heights overlooking Harpers Ferry.

Cobb’s Legion infantry under Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar accompanied Cobb’s Brigade to Crampton’s Gap. Many of the 248 soldiers were from Athens, GA. By the time Cobb’s Legion took position at the gap, Parham’s line at the foot of the mountain had been overrun. Col. Lamar desperately tried to form a line south of the gap. But the 1st New Jersey Brigade broke through and gained ground above and behind the Legion. The Legion, outnumbered 6 to 1 and partly surrounded, stood its ground.

After suffering 72% casualties, including the mortally wounded Lamar, some of the men escaped to the top of the gap where a final stand was being made by Gen. Cobb with 2 guns of the Troup Artillery and refugees
The Marker Stands on the Edge of the Woodline image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
3. The Marker Stands on the Edge of the Woodline
from the other regiments. In large measure Cobb’s Legion was responsible for delaying the Federal advance until nightfall. The next day Harpers Ferry surrendered.
 
Erected 1992 by Athens (Georgia) Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 24.359′ N, 77° 38.405′ W. Marker is near Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Gapland Road and Townsend Road, on the right when traveling west on Gapland Road. Touch for map. Inside Gathland State Park. Marker is in this post office area: Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle for Crampton’s Gap (within shouting distance of this marker); Maryland Campaign of 1862 / The Lost Orders (within shouting distance of this marker); George Alfred Townsend (within shouting distance of this marker); 1862 Antietam Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Mell Rifles & Troup Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); War Correspondents Memorial Arch (within shouting distance of this marker); First New Jersey Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); War Correspondents (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
More about this marker. This is quite possibly the “northernmost” Georgia state marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Cobb’s Legion. Rather detailed site covering the infantry, cavalry and artillery (Troup’s) components of the Legion. (Submitted on August 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. General Cobb’s Account of the Battle. (Submitted on August 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Biography of Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar. (Submitted on August 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,913 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 11, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on August 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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