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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cherokee in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Great Smokies

 
 
The Great Smokies Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 14, 2009
1. The Great Smokies Marker
Inscription. (Side One):
The Great Smokies: scenic, diverse, culturally rich. The scenic view here are well known; lesser known is the abundance of life. The Smokies' rugged topography creates a diversity of species found in few other places in North America. And the Smokies' rich human heritage includes the Cherokee, decades of mountain culture, and a unique national park story. The best experience the Smokies you must leave your car. Walk the trails, visit the historic sites, and enjoy the sanctuary that is Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

(side 2):
Nature forged the Great Smokies, but the hands of Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers helped shape the national park we know today. During the 1930s, enrollment peaked as 4,300 men worked here, building roads, campgrounds, trails, and buildings. The also reared fish for stocking, fought fires, and practiced innumerable other trades. Their work remains an important part of the fabric of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The CCC was the first of several federal job programs designed to lift the nation out of the Great Depression. Created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933, the CCC employed three million men, most of them between 18 and 25 years old. Roosevelt declared their work "of moral and spiritual value, not only to those ... taking part, but to
Hands That Built image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 14, 2009
2. Hands That Built
the rest of the country as well."
 
Erected by National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 35° 36.653′ N, 83° 25.486′ W. Marker is in Cherokee, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker is on U.S. 441. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cherokee NC 28719, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Appalachian Trail (a few steps from this marker); Hands That Built (a few steps from this marker); Rockefeller Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker in Tennessee); Land of Diversity (within shouting distance of this marker in Tennessee); People of the Mountains (within shouting distance of this marker); “To the free people of America” (within shouting distance of this marker); A Mountain Sanctuary (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Great Smoky Mountains National Park (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cherokee.
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkEnvironmentNatural Features
 
The Great Smokies Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2012
3. The Great Smokies Markers
The Great Smokies Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2012
4. The Great Smokies Markers
CCC Camp image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 14, 2009
5. CCC Camp
Symbols indicate locations of CCC camps in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Campswere numbered sewuentially, based upon the order in which they were established.
CCC Workers image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 14, 2009
6. CCC Workers
CCC workers performed tasks ranging from the administrative to the backbreaking. CCC worker planes shingles, and a crew builds the bridge over Little River near Elkmont. Within Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Oconaluftee Visitor Center Rockefeller Memorial, and Park Headquarters near Gatlinburg are all endring examples of the work of CCC stonemasons.
CCC Camp image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, March 14, 2009
7. CCC Camp
Twenty-two CCC camps-each home to about 200 men-were built in the park. Each ws commanded by an army officer, and camp life inevitable had military aspects. Most enrollees received $30.00 per month, of which $25.00 was mailed home.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 19, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,270 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 19, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on August 29, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6, 7. submitted on June 19, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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