Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Funkstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Funkstown Bridge No. 2

 
 
Funkstown Bridge No. 2 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 28, 2007
1. Funkstown Bridge No. 2 Marker
Inscription. This bridge over Antietam Creek at Funkstown was built in 1833 by George Weaver for $1,800. At this site was Shafer’s Mill where flour was ground. The most notable feature of this bridge is the graduated size of its three arches, growing larger from the east to the west as it rises from low ground to high on the western bank. The spans of the bridge are 20', 31' and 35'; and the bridge is 109' in length.
 
Erected by Washington County Historical Advisory Committee.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Washington County Historical Advisory Committee marker series.
 
Location. 39° 36.646′ N, 77° 42.722′ W. Marker is in Funkstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on West Baltimore Street / Oak Ridge Drive, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located at the east end of Funkstown Bridge No. 2. Marker is in this post office area: Funkstown MD 21734, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. M3A1 Light Tank (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Building the Funkstown Bridge (about 700 feet away); Civil War Hospital Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Baltimore Street
Marker at the East End of Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 28, 2007
2. Marker at the East End of Bridge
Marker is just to the left of the right most warning sign. The marker is typical of the "small brown" markers placed in Washington County for the stone bridges or other notable historical locations.
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Keller Home (approx. 0.3 miles away); This Plot is Dedicated to Public Use (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gen. Robert E. Lee (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battle of Funkstown (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Funkstown.
 
Also see . . .  The Stone Bridges of Washington County, Maryland. (Submitted on August 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
View of the Bridge from Downstream image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 28, 2007
3. View of the Bridge from Downstream
View of the bridge from downstream image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck
4. View of the bridge from downstream
View of the bridge, from across the park image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck
5. View of the bridge, from across the park
Funkstown Bridge No. 2, circa 1910 image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck
6. Funkstown Bridge No. 2, circa 1910
Photograph by John C. Artz. From The Antietam and Its Bridges: The Annals of an Historic Stream by Helen Ashe Hays. New York: G. P. Putman's Sons, 1910.
Bridge Rehabilitated image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 5, 2009
7. Bridge Rehabilitated
Plaque placed in 2008 indicating the completion of rehabilitation on the bridge.
Original Bridge cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 5, 2009
8. Original Bridge cornerstone
"Wing" of the Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 5, 2009
9. "Wing" of the Bridge
Bridge No. 2 Spaning the Antietam image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 28, 2007
10. Bridge No. 2 Spaning the Antietam
Also unique to this bridge is the angle of the north side "wing" of the bridge (seen on the left edge of the photograph). This was added to facilitate traffic that approached the bridge at an angle. A similar wing is on the western end.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,020 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on February 19, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   7, 8, 9. submitted on December 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   10. submitted on August 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement