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Pickens in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County

 
 
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>Carolina Indian Wars Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
1. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
Carolina Indian Wars Plaque
Inscription.
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County who Answered their Call to Duty and Made the Supreme Sacrifice
For our future generations, their youth, they gave away, never again to see the land between the Oolenoy River Valley and the Keowee River
Remember always their valor...For they are of us...Pickens...A County That Went to War


Carolina Indian Wars
1760

British Army Lieutenant Richard Coytmore
Unknown British Soldier
Twenty-two Cherokee Indian Chiefs
Fort Prince George, a British Army Garrison, was constructed in 1753 on the eastern bank of the Keowee River by order of colonial South Carolina's Governor Glenn. in 1759, British Army Lieutenant Richard Coytmore was assigned as the new commander of Fort Prince George. Tensions were continuously mounting between the British and the Cherokee Nation. On February 16, 1760, Coytmore and two others were ambushed by the Cherokee at the river's edge. Coytmore was mortally wounded during the skirmish. In retaliation, the twenty-two Cherokee Indian chiefs being held prisoner within the fort were executed. This is the first military engagement recorded in the history of Pickens County where the loss of life was incurred.

War of American Independence
1776

Francis Salvador
1747-1776
Killed
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>War of American Independence Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
2. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
War of American Independence Plaque
August 1st, 1776, along the Seneca
River near what is today Clemson
University while a volunteer in an
expedition against the Cherokee
First person of the Jewish faith to hold
public office in South Carolina and to die
for American independence
In 1773 Salvador emigrated as a young man to near present-day Greenwood
(then part of the Ninety-Six Judicial District of South Carolina)
He served in the Committee to Enforce the Continental Association in Ninety-Six District (1775), and as a member of South Carolina's first and second provincial congresses (1775, and 1776-78), and of the first General assembly of South Carolina (1776). During these years, Salvador helped implement the state's revised courts, currency system, and election districts. Further, he participated in drafting South Carolina's first state constitution.

As a volunteer in the War for American Independence, Salvador died along with a few other unknown patriots during the only Revolutionary War battle fought on soil that in time became Pickens County. He was shot from his horse and scalped. One of Salvador's comrades-in-arms, Major Samuel Taylor, named his 400 acre plantation on the Seneca River "San Salvador", which means "Without Salvador". This acreage was near General Andrew Pickens' Hopewell Plantation and included a portion of the former Cherokee town
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>War Between the States Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
3. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
War Between the States Plaque
of Esseneca and the site of the Revolutionary War Fort Rutledge.

Born an Englishmen, he cast his lot with America;
true to his ancient faith, he gave his life to
fulfill hopes of liberty and understanding.


War Between the States
1861-1865

Eastern Pickens District
[Click on photo for list of the fallen.]

World War I
1917-1918
[Click on photo for list of the fallen.]

World War II
1941-1945
[Click on photo for list of the fallen.]

Korean War
1950-1953
[Click on photo for list of the fallen.]

Vietnam War
1961-1975
[Click on photo for list of the fallen.]

Global War on Terrorism
September 11th, 2001

Kimberly Nicole Hampton
1976-2004
of
Easley
Killed in Action
January 2nd, 2004,
west of Baghdad, near Fallujah, Iraq
First female combat pilot
shot down and killed
in United States military aviation history
First female combat casualty
from
South Carolina and the County of Pickens
Captain Kimberly Nicole Hampton, while serving as Commander (Dark Horse 6) of D Troop, First Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 82nd Airborne Division, was killed in action
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>World War I Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
4. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
World War I Plaque
during offensive operations near Fallujah, Iraq against armed enemy insurgents when her OH-58D Kiowa helicopter she was piloting was hit by surface-to-air ground fire.
With her brilliant smile, she was the face of liberty.

 
Location. 34° 52.967′ N, 82° 42.4′ W. Marker is in Pickens, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Pendleton Street 0.1 miles south of West Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located near the south entrance of the Pickens County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Andrew Pickens Charted the Way (here, next to this marker); Pickens County Buffalo Soldiers (here, next to this marker); Pickens County Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial (here, next to this marker); Major General Andrew Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Joab Mauldin (within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); John C. Calhoun (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Robert E. Lee
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>World War II Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
5. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
World War II Plaque
(within shouting distance of this marker); In Honor of Elinor Knight (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles Ladd Cureton (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pickens.
 
Also see . . .
1. Trailing Issaqueena. Historians have argued for well over one hundred years about the origin of a local legend in upstate South Carolina, circa 1760, about a young Cherokee woman who made an epic ride from her native village of Keowee to a log fort on the edge of the Carolina frontier, to warn her white lover of an imminent Indian attack. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Fort Prince George (South Carolina). Fort Prince George (not to be confused with Prince's Fort, which was in use in 1777 and also in South Carolina) was constructed in 1753 in northwest South Carolina, on the Cherokee Path. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Francis Salvador. When we think of Jewish heroes of the American Revolution, Haym Salomon, the "financier" of the patriot cause or Isaac Franks, aide-de-camp to General George Washington, are the first names that come to mind. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Francis Salvador
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>Korean War Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
6. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
Korean War Plaque
. Francis Salvador (1747 – August 1, 1776), was the first American Jew to be killed in the American Revolution, fighting on the South Carolina frontier. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Francis Salvador. Marker located in Greenwood County dedicated to Salvador. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Flag Pole Marker. Newberry marker dedicated to Kimberly Nicole Hampton. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Kimberly Hampton. Captain Kimberly Nicole Hampton (August 18, 1976 in Greenville, South Carolina – January 2, 2004 in Fallujah, Iraq) was the first female military pilot to be shot down and killed in United States history. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War, 2nd IraqWar, KoreanWar, US CivilWar, VietnamWar, World IWar, World IIWars, US Indian
 
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>Vietnam War Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
7. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
Vietnam War Plaque
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -<br>Global War on Terrorism Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
8. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial -
Global War on Terrorism Plaque
To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
9. To the Valiant Citizen-Soldiers of Pickens County Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,440 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on June 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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