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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sterling in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lanesville Families

 
 
Lanesville Families Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 14, 2009
1. Lanesville Families Marker
Inscription. The Lanesville House has been home to just two families during the 212 years that it was occupied. Lane family descendants lived here for 162 years, from 1779-1941. Dr. Claude Moore purchased the house and land in December, 1941, and made his home here until his death in July, 1991. Loudoun County has maintained the house since July, 1991.

William Lane bought the property from the King sisters in 1779 and built the earliest portions of the Lanesville House. Ann Carr Lane is believed to be the first child born in the Lanesville House. Ann, daughter of William and Sarah Lane, was born in 1781.

In 1800, Hardage Lane bought a portion of the property from his brother, William. Hardage and his wife, Rachel, had daughter Keturah in 1785; when Hardage passed away in 1803, Keturah continued to live in the house. During this same period, Keturah married John Keen, and had son Newton. John and Keturah operated the Lanesville Ordinary and Post Office from their home.

In 1814, John Keene passed away. Keturah then married Benjamin Bridges; they continued to run the Lanesville Ordinary and Post Office. They had three sons: Hardage Jr. (1818-1864), Benjamin II (1820-1900), and William (who died in infancy).

Keturah Lane Keen Bridges passed away in 1849. Her son, Benjamin Bridges II married Lucy Alice Elgin in 1853. They lived
Markers Behind Lanesville House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Markers Behind Lanesville House
in the Lanesville House and had five children, Dorsey, Molly, Frank, Benjamin III, and Irene. In 1900, Benjamin Bridges II passed away; his wife Lucy and daughter Irene continued to live in the house; in 1905, the house was purchased by his daughter Irene after Lucy's passing in 1904.

In 1941, Irene Bridges placed the Lanesville House and surrounding property on auction. Dr. Claude Moore purchased the property from Irene, and continued to make changes to the property, maintaining his residence for 50 years. Eventually, the property came under the ownership of Loudoun County and was opened as a park in 1990.
 
Location. 39° 1.059′ N, 77° 24.234′ W. Marker is in Sterling, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker can be reached from Old Vestals Gap Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located behind the Lanesville House, in Claude Moore Park. Marker is in this post office area: Sterling VA 20164, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lanesville Outbuildings (here, next to this marker); Lanesville House and Vestal's Gap Road (a few steps from this marker); Lanesville Architecture (a few steps from this marker); Lanesville Historic Area (a few steps from this marker); Vestal's Gap Road (within shouting distance of this marker); The Braddock Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Vestal's Gap Road in the 1800s (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Guilford Signal Station (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sterling.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays portraits of Benjamin Bridges II, Lucy Alice Eglin Bridges, Dorsey Bridges, and Irene Bridges. On the right are pages from the Deed from King to Lane and Estate holdings of John Keene.
 
Also see . . .  Biography of Dr. Claude Moore. From the Claude Moore Foundation. (Submitted on June 20, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USNotable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 20, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 893 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 20, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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