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Fort Jefferson in Darke County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Jefferson / St. Clair’s Defeat

 
 
Fort Jefferson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
1. Fort Jefferson Marker
Inscription.
Fort Jefferson. During the Indian Wars of 1790-1795, the United States built a chain of forts in the contested area of what is today western Ohio. These forts were built as a result of various tribes of the region attacking the encroaching American population as they moved north of the Ohio River. In October 1791, General Arthur St. Clair, governor of the Northwest Territory, set out on a mission to punish the tribes and on October 12, ordered his forces to build Fort Jefferson, the fourth link in that chain of forts stretching north from Fort Washington (Cincinnati) to Fort Deposit (Waterville). Each fort was generally a hard day's march of each other, and the site was chosen because of nearness to a supply of fresh water. The fort was named in honor of Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson.

St. Clair’s Defeat. General Arthur St.Clair, governor of the Northwest Territory, left Fort Jefferson on October 24, 1791, on a mission to subdue Indian tribes that had attacked white settlers coming north of the Ohio River. St. Clair and his forces progressed only about 28 miles before halting at the east branch of the Wabash River. On November 4, forces under Chief Little Turtle inflicted the worst defeat ever by Indians upon the United States army. Over 600 soldiers were killed and 300 wounded. During the next 24 hours,
St. Clair's Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
2. St. Clair's Defeat Marker
survivors made their way back to Fort Jefferson. Within two years, General "Mad" Anthony Wayne assembled the Legion of the United States for another campaign against the Indians. In October 1793, Wayne used Fort Jefferson as a supply base during the campaign that resulted in the American victory at Fallen Timbers in August 1794. The subsequent August 1795 Treaty of Greenville assured peace in Ohio for the next decade.
 
Erected 2003 by The Ohio Bicentennial Commission, the Longaberger Company, Veterans Organizations, Second National Bank, and the Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 5-19.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 40° 1.562′ N, 84° 39.368′ W. Marker is in Fort Jefferson, Ohio, in Darke County. Marker is on Weavers-Fort Jefferson Road 0.1 miles west of Ohio Route 121, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in the state park maintained by the Ohio Historical Society. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville OH 45331, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Jefferson: A Link in a Chain (a few steps from this marker); Fort Jefferson
Fort Jefferson Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., February 15, 2009
3. Fort Jefferson Marker Detail
(within shouting distance of this marker); Studabaker School (approx. 3.4 miles away); Fort Black (approx. 4.8 miles away); Commemorating Passage of the Lincoln Funeral Train (approx. 5 miles away); Tecumseh / Shawnee Prophet's Town (approx. 5.1 miles away); In Memory of Major John Mills (approx. 5.1 miles away); Signing of the Treaty of Greene Ville (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Jefferson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Jefferson. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Arthur St. Clair. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. St. Clair's Defeat. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. Ohio's Native American Wars. This web link was both published and made available
Fort Jefferson / St. Clair’s Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
4. Fort Jefferson / St. Clair’s Defeat Marker
This historical marker is located at the site of the Fort Jefferson State Memorial Park.
by, "Touring Ohio." (Submitted on June 26, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. Battle of the Wabash. This web link was both published and made available by, "Absolute Astronomy.com," in it's quest to enable "exploring the universe of knowledge" (Submitted on June 26, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansNotable EventsWars, US Indian
 
Fort Jefferson / St. Clair’s Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
5. Fort Jefferson / St. Clair’s Defeat Marker
View of historical marker on the grounds of Ohio Historical Society maintained property.
Fort Jefferson State Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
6. Fort Jefferson State Memorial Park
View of marker that helps explain the role of Fort Jefferson in the American military campaigns of 1790-1795.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 21, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,190 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   2. submitted on June 26, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   3. submitted on March 15, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on June 26, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   5, 6. submitted on June 25, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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