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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stone Street Historic District and Colonial New York Street Plan

Exploring Downtown

 
 
Stone Street Historic District and Colonial New York Street Plan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
1. Stone Street Historic District and Colonial New York Street Plan Marker
Inscription.
Stone Street Historic District
The cluster of buildings along winding Stone, South William, and Pearl Streets and Coenties Alley forms one of Downtown’s last oases of early 19th-century New York.

Stone Street’s stores and lofts were built for dry-goods merchants and importers, shortly after the Great Fire of 1835. Picturesque turn-of-the-century additions include Dutch-style facades with stepped gables on South William Street, designed for New York merchant Amos Eno, who loved the city’s colonial history.

Following decades of neglect, a joint partnership between the Landmarks Commission and other city agencies, the Alliance for Downtown New York and Stone Street owners has transformed Stone Street from a derelict back alley into one of Downtown’s liveliest scenes. Restored buildings, granite paving, bluestone sidewalks and period streetlights set the stage for the half dozen restaurants and cafes, whose outdoor tables are jammed with crowds of happy New Yorkers.

The original location of Stone Street, one of the first paved streets in the city of New York, is still visible today in the existing street bed and in the brown brick pathway, edged in stone, which passes through the lobby of the building located at 85 Broad Street.

Colonial New York Street Plan
New York City originated in 1624
Marker in Downtown Manhattan image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
2. Marker in Downtown Manhattan
as the Dutch settlement of Nieuw Amsterdam. The Great Fire of 1835 destroyed much of what survived from the Dutch settlement. One very visible aspect of the old Dutch village at the southern tip of Manhattan Island endures: the street layout, which still plays a vital role in defining Downtown.

Those narrow, winding streets, edged by skyscrapers forming the famous Wall Street canyons, follow the pattern laid out by Colonial predecessors three centuries ago, Beaver Street, Mill Lane, Marketfield Street, Pearl Street, and a dozen more, conform to the plan illustrated in the city’s earliest maps.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 42.252′ N, 74° 0.641′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Stone Street and Coenties Alley, on the right when traveling west on Stone Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dutch Hoog Straat (a few steps from this marker); 13 South William Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Asser Levy’s Home (within shouting distance of this marker); First Printing Press in the Colony of New York
Marker on Historic Stone Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
3. Marker on Historic Stone Street
(within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnam War Veterans Memorial / Dutch City Hall Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Stadt Huys (City Hall) (within shouting distance of this marker); Fraunces Tavern Block Historic District (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Adriaen van der Donck’s Home (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. Several pictures appear on the marker including a photograph of Stone Street, circa 2003, a Historical photograph of Stone Street, and a 1664 illustration of Duke Street plan. Also present is a picture of lower New York engulfed in flames, with a caption of “The Great Fire of December 16 and 17, 1835 leveled over twenty Downtown blocks in the area bounded by Wall Street, Broad Street, Coenties Slip, and the East River. It took nineteen hundred firefighters, some from as far away as Philadelphia, to bring the fire under control, but not before the city had sustained property losses upwards of $40 million, bankrupting most of New York’s fire insurance companies.”
 
Related markers.
Stone Street Historic District image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
4. Stone Street Historic District
Stone Street contains many early 19th-century buildings, as seen in this photo.
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers in lower Manhattan erected by the Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Categories. Colonial EraRoads & Vehicles
 
Outdoor Cafes on Stone Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
5. Outdoor Cafes on Stone Street
This photo shows some of the outdoor resturants mentioned on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 26, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,322 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 26, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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