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Boalsburg in Centre County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer

Pennsylvania Military Museum

 
 
M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
1. M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer Marker
Inscription. The M114A2 howitzer, introduced in 1942 as the M1, served in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam with the Army and Marine Corps. It also served with the National Guard into the 1980s. Its 11-man crew could fire forty rounds per hour, lobbing each 85-pound shell nearly nine miles. The M114A2 remains in service in forty countries worldwide as of 2004.

About the M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer
Weight: 12,750 lbs.
Caliber: 155 mm
Crew: 11 men
Maximum Range: 9.07 miles or 14.6 kilometers
Projectile Weight: 84.8 lbs.
Maximum rate of fire: 4 rounds per minute
Sustained rate of fire: 1 rounds per minute
Maximum elevation: 63 degrees


 
Location. 40° 46.797′ N, 77° 47.805′ W. Marker is in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, in Centre County. Marker is on Old Boalsburg Road 0.1 miles north of Boal Avenue (U.S. 322), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located to the east of the parking area for the Pennsylvania Military Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Boalsburg PA 16827, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 112th Machine Gun Company (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters Troop 28th Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 28th Division Shrine
Marker and Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
2. Marker and Howitzer
(within shouting distance of this marker); M4A1(76)W General Sherman Tank (within shouting distance of this marker); Ordnance QF, 4.5-inch Howitzer Mark II (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 103rd Engineers (about 400 feet away); M59 Armored Personnel Carrier (about 500 feet away); Coshocton Train Wreck (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boalsburg.
 
More about this marker. On the right quadrant of the marker are photos of the M114A2 Howitzer in service. One photo shows, A gun crew prepares a howitzer for action during the Korean War. Even with a mechanism designed to control the movement of the cannon, the gun can recoil up to five feet each time it is fired. The other photo shows A field artillery unit in North Korea digs in a battery of 155mm howitzers that have just been towed into position. Traversing and elevating handwheels assist the gun crew in aiming the 6 1/2 ton weapon.
 
Also see . . .  History of the M114 Howitzer. Wikipedia article. (Submitted on June 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
3. M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer
The howitzer is configured in traveling configuration. Behind the wheels, attached to the trails, are large spades. When placed into action, the spades are connected to the end of the trails. They serve to reduce the effects of the weapon's recoil. The large spring to the side of the barrel is part of a balancing system to aid elevation.
 
 
Categories. War, KoreanWar, VietnamWar, World II
 
Front of the Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
4. Front of the Howitzer
A locking arm below the barrel is placed to secure the howitzer for traveling. The simple shield on the howitzer serves to protect the gunners mostly from the effects of firing the weapon, and is only reinforced for simple splinter protection.
Back of Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
5. Back of Howitzer
From the back, the large breech mechanism comes into view. Note also the traversing wheel to the side of the breech.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,745 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 28, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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