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Near Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Burkittsville: Henry Burkitt’s Town

 
 
Burkittsville: Henry Burkitt's Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
1. Burkittsville: Henry Burkitt's Town Marker
Inscription. The first settlers in this area cleared their farm land and raised their families along two Indian trails that crossed here. Joshua Harley, one of these pioneers and a veteran of the American Revolution, started the settlement’s first dry goods store. In 1824 Harley’s store became Harley’s post office. Henry Burkitt moved here from Pennsylvania about 1825 and laid out a town along the east-west trail, subdividing larger tracts bought from his neighbors. In 1829, Burkitt donated property on Cemetery Hill to the Reformed Germans, who built a church on it. The Resurrection German Reformed Church, originally called “Union Church,” was shared by the Lutherans until they built St. Paul’s next door. The cemetery behind these churches was known as “Union Cemetery,” because both congregations buried their dead there. Burkitt died before he finished his town, but the village grew and became known as Henry Burkitt’s Town. Joshua Harley, the community’s first store keeper and postmaster had been forgotten. At the time of the Battle of South Mountain, Burkittsville had approximately 50 houses and 200 inhabitants.

Donated to the people of the United States in loving memory of our daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, wife, and mother, Bridget Towne Riedel by her family—the Riedels of Virginia.
 
Erected by
Three Blue and Gray Education Society Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
2. Three Blue and Gray Education Society Markers
Blue and Gray Education Society.
 
Location. 39° 24.087′ N, 77° 38.27′ W. Marker is near Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Gapland Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chew’s Ashby Artillery (here, next to this marker); “Sealed With Their Lives” (here, next to this marker); Gath's Empty Tomb (approx. ¼ mile away); Mausoleum (approx. ¼ mile away); Brownsville Pass: Semmes’ Gamble (approx. ¼ mile away); GATH: The Man and His Mountain (approx. ¼ mile away); Troup Light Artillery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Padgett’s Field: Confederate Last Stand (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
More about this marker. The marker features a newspaper drawing showing the, “Charge of the Union VI Corps at Burkittsville.”
 
Also see . . .  Walking Tour of Burkittsville. (Submitted on August 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Interesting Coincidence
Just South
The Original Burkitt House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
3. The Original Burkitt House
The house was owned by John D. Garrott at the time of the Civil War. The farm behind the house was a staging point for Federal forces advancing against South Mountain.
of the Lutheran Church stands the Dr. Tilghman Biser House. At the time of the Battle on Crampton’s Gap, the doctor’s nephew, Lewis Lamar was studying medicine at the house. Lewis was distantly related to John B. and Jefferson M. Lamar, both of whom were members of Cobb’s Georgia Brigade and both died of wounds in the fighting.
    — Submitted August 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
David Arnold House and Farm image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
4. David Arnold House and Farm
The Arnold family homestead sits between the two Indian paths. The original portions of this house were built in 1798 and major additions to the house were made in the later half of the 1800s. During the Battle of South Mountain, the Vermont Brigade deployed around this house to attack the Confederate battle line further up hill.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,931 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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