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Parkers Crossroads in Henderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle of Parker's Crossroads

Tour Stop 7

 
 
Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 14, 2009
1. Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker
Inscription.
Old Split-Rail Fence
December 31, 1862

At approximately 11:00 a.m., Colonel Dunham's Brigade positioned themselves behind a split-rail fence located a few feet behind this area running east and west to the Lexington/Huntingdon Road. By afternoon, and under fire at this position for two hours, many of the men were killed or wounded by rails splintered by the Confederate shelling. Private Joseph Hotz, 50th Indiana, later wrote his wife, "a shell hit the fence near which I stood and the rail struck me down."

Showing great courage, Dunham's men unsuccessfully charged out into the crossfire coming from the Confederate encirclement located on the sandy rise to the northeast, north and northwest.

Confederate Lieutenant Colonel Alonzo Napier led a counterattack on the Union left flank and fell mortally wounded while waving his men on from atop the fence. On the following morning the Union commander ordered that Union troops killed during the previous day's fight be buried on the knoll near the east end of the Union line. Recent archaeological excavations confirmed the location of a number of gravesites.
 
Erected by Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Association.
 
Location. 35° 47.322′ N, 88° 23.364′ 
Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker Map image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 8, 2010
2. Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker Map
W. Marker is in Parkers Crossroads, Tennessee, in Henderson County. Marker is on Federal Lane, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located at stop seven, of the driving tour of Parker's Crossroads Battlefield. The parking area is adjacent to Interstate 40. Marker is in this post office area: Wildersville TN 38388, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nathan Bedford Forrest (a few steps from this marker); Lt. Col. Alonzo Napier (within shouting distance of this marker); Battlefield Overview (within shouting distance of this marker); McPeake Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Withdrawal to the Split-Rail Fence (within shouting distance of this marker); A Very Successful Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Three Desperate Charges (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Lexington-Huntingdon Road (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parkers Crossroads.
 
Also see . . .
1. Parkers Crossroads. Civil War Preservation Trust site detailing the battle. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Association. Details about the battle and efforts to preserve the field. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Parking Area for Southern Loop Walking Trail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Parking Area for Southern Loop Walking Trail
The southern loop trail covers many of the Federal positions during the battle. In this view is a replica 12-pounder Napoleon, a marker explaining this tour stop, and the kiosk (to the right).
Marker at Stop Seven image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 14, 2009
4. Marker at Stop Seven
The marker is on a foot path leading from the parking lot.
Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, October 8, 2010
5. Battle of Parker's Crossroads Marker
Reconstructed Split Rail Fence image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 14, 2009
6. Reconstructed Split Rail Fence
Looking east down the reconstructed spit rail fence, at the location held by the Federals during the battle. The 39th Iowa Infantry held this section of the line.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,125 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on August 22, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   3. submitted on July 3, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 22, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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