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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Beacon of Peace

 
 
Beacon of Peace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 5, 2009
1. Beacon of Peace Marker
Inscription.
"May it stand as it did in war - as a beacon to guide men searching their way through the darkness. May it stand throughout all ages as a symbol of mercy, peace, and understanding."
Maryland Governor Millard Tawes
Church Rededication Service, September 2, 1962

The Battle of Antietam was the bloodiest one-day battle in American History. Yet ironically one of the most noted landmarks on this field of combat is a house of worship associated with peace and love. This historic church was built by local German Baptist Brethren in 1852 on land donated by local farmer Samuel Mumma. The name "Dunker" comes from their practice of full immersion baptism. During its early history the congregation consisted of about a half-dozen farm families from the local area. Although heavily damaged during the battle by rifle and artillery fire, the church survived, only to be blown down by a windstorm in 1921. Rebuilt for the Civil War Centennial, it stands today as not only a step back in time, but also as a solemn reminder of the impact the battle had on the local families.
 
Erected 2009 by Antietam National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 39° 28.53′ N, 77° 44.803′ 
Beacon of Peace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Beacon of Peace Marker
W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Dunker Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike near Smoketown Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop one of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Destroy the Rebel Army (here, next to this marker); Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); Twelfth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Twelfth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 5th, 7th and 66th Ohio Infantry Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Greene's Division, Twelfth Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Reserve Artillery, Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); 59th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Dunkard Church (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dunker Church. National Park Service page detailing the history of the church. (Submitted on July 6, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. J. Millard Tawes. John Millard Tawes (April
Beacon of Peace Marker<br>The Church Through the Ages image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
3. Beacon of Peace Marker
The Church Through the Ages
Left: After the battle the church was repaired, but in 1921 a severe windstorm collapsed the church. Center: During the 1930s and 1940s a private structure stood on the foundation as a lunch stand. Right: The church was reconstructed in 1962 using many original materials.
8, 1894 – June 25, 1979), a member of the United States Democratic Party, was the 54th Governor of Maryland in the United States from 1959 to 1967. (Submitted on September 21, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. German Baptist. The German Baptist movement was founded as a fusion of the Anabaptist and Radical Pietist movements. German Baptists are not to be confused with Primitive, Separate, Southern, Particular, and all other mainline Baptist denominations who, although generally unified on rudimentary doctrines such as baptism, would have conflicting views in other areas. (Submitted on September 21, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Old Marker at this Location. This marker replaced an older one at this location titled "Symbol of Peace and Brotherhood." (Submitted on September 21, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.War, US Civil
 
Beacon of Peace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Beacon of Peace Marker
The inside of the church today. During services, the congregation was divided with men seated on one side and women on the other. The Dunkers believed in modesty and simplicity, concepts clearly evident in this structure.
Waysides in Front of the Dunker Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
5. Waysides in Front of the Dunker Church
Marker at the Dunker Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 11, 2011
6. Marker at the Dunker Church
The Dunker Church is see here behind the Beacon of Peace marker.
Beacon of Peace Marker and Dunker Church image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
7. Beacon of Peace Marker and Dunker Church
The Dunker Church Reconstructed as it Looks Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
8. The Dunker Church Reconstructed as it Looks Today
Photo was taken on the 145th anniversary of the battle.
Interior of the Church as Reconstructed image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
9. Interior of the Church as Reconstructed
Dunker Church Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
10. Dunker Church Interior
Dunker Church Interior image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
11. Dunker Church Interior
J. Millard Tawes (1894–1979) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
12. J. Millard Tawes (1894–1979)
Gov. Tawes spoke at the church's rededication on the centennial anniversary of the battle.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 6, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 999 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 6, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on July 6, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on April 15, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8, 9. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   10, 11, 12. submitted on September 21, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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