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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Llano in Llano County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Packsaddle Mountain

 
 
Packsaddle Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 4, 2009
1. Packsaddle Mountain Marker
Inscription.
Two and one half miles east
on the
Packsaddle Mountain

in a battle fought August 4, 1873
Captain J. R. Moss, Stephen B. Moss
William B. Moss, Eli Lloyd
Arch Martin, Pink Ayers
E. D. Harrington and Robert Brown
routed a band of Indians
thrice their number

The last Indian battle in this region.

 
Erected 1936 by the State of Texas. (Marker Number 9452.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 30° 36.662′ N, 98° 31.084′ W. Marker is in Llano, Texas, in Llano County. Marker is on State Highway 71, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. from Llano take SH 71 east 15.2 miles to ROW. Marker is in this post office area: Llano TX 78643, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early Explorers in Llano County (approx. 1.3 miles away); Antlers Hotel (approx. 5.9 miles away); McKinley Coach (approx. 6 miles away); The Antlers Caboose Rooms (approx. 6 miles away); Fisher - Miller - Grant
Packsaddle Mtn from the NW end image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. Packsaddle Mtn from the NW end
(approx. 6½ miles away); C.S.A. Salt Works (approx. 9.9 miles away); Hoover's Valley Cemetery (approx. 10.4 miles away); Oxford Cemetery (approx. 11.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia article. Provides additional pictures, some from on top of Packsaddle. (Submitted on July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

2. Excerpt from book Trail drivers of Texas, University of Texas Press. Relates an encounter with Indians at the base of Packsaddle. (Submitted on July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. Los Almagres, the Lost Spanish Mine. Good overview on mining activity at Packsaddle over the years. Includes pictures from on top of Packsaddle. (Submitted on July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

4. J.W. Wilbarger's Indian Depredations in Texas. Texas State Library overview of J.W. Wilbarger's classic, Indian Depredations in Texas. Published about 1890, it includes probably one of the earliest accounts of the fight at Packsaddle. (Submitted on July 9, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

5. Historical marker discussing Cerro del Amalgre. Many suspect Packsaddle Mountain as being Cerro del Almalgre, the site of a Spanish mine discovered by Bernardo de Miranda in 1756. (Submitted on July 9, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

6. Vandals Target Texas’ Historical Markers
Packsaddle Mountain Mtn from SE end image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
3. Packsaddle Mountain Mtn from SE end
. Dallas Observer (Submitted on March 22, 2017.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Packsaddle Mountain
While the marker focuses on Packsaddle as the site of a famous battle between Ranchers and Indians, Packsaddle Mountain is equally famous as the center of stories of lost Spanish mines and the attempts to re-discover them over the years. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

2. Damage to marker.
Recently this 81-year-old marker, commemorating the last Indian battle in this region, was vandalized with black spray paint writing saying “White history celebrates genocide."

The Texas Historical Commission cleaned the granite, with the help of a conservator, and installed a new bronze wreath and star.
    — Submitted March 20, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Packsaddle Mountain located behind Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, December 8, 2015
4. Packsaddle Mountain located behind Marker
View to northeast across State Highway 71
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,414 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 8, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4. submitted on December 11, 2015, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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