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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cumberland in Cumberland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jackson Davis

Cumberland Court House, Virginia

 

—Cumberland County —

 
Jackson Davis CRIEHT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 25, 2009
1. Jackson Davis CRIEHT Marker
Inscription. Jackson Davis, an educational reformer and amateur photographer, was born in Cumberland County, VA, to William Anderson and Sally Wyatt (Guy) Davis on September 25, 1882. He attended the public schools of Richmond, VA, and received his B.A. from the College of William and Mary in 1902 and his M.A. from Columbia University in 1908.

Throughout his career Davis specialized in Southern education, interracial problems, and education in Belgian Congo and Liberia. From 1915 to 1946 his work at the General Education Board in New York, NY, was focused on improving education in the Southern states. During this time he took nearly 6,000 photographs of African-American schools, teachers and students throughout the Southeastern United States. His photographs – most intended to demonstrate the wretched conditions of African-American schools and to show how they could be improved – provide a unique view of Southern education during the first half of the twentieth century.

Davis died in Cartersville, VA, on April 15, 1947. At the time of his death he was president of the board of trustees of Booker T. Washington Institute in Liberia, president of the New York Colonization Society, and a member of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation and of the Advisory Committee on Education in Liberia. Davis’ influence on
Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail® Map. image. Click for full size.
2. Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail® Map.
Appomattox County
1. Winonah Camp/Mozella Price Home
2. Carver-Price School
3. Education in 1800's Rural Virginia

Buckingham County
4. One-Room Schoolhouse
5. Carter G. Woodson Birthplace

Cumberland County
6. Hamilton High School
7. Rosenwald School at Cartersville
8. Jackson Davis

Amelia County
9. Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and School
10. Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil

Chesterfield County
11. Virginia State University

Petersburg
12. Earliest Known Public High School for African Americans in Virginia
13. McKenney Library
14. The Peabody-Williams School

Dinwiddie County
15. Southside Virginia Training Center
16. Rocky Branch School
17. Early Education in Dinwiddie County

Nottoway County
18. Blackstone Female Institute
19. Mt. Nebo Church
20. Ingleside Training Institute

Lunenburg County
21. The People's Community Center
22. St. Matthew's Lutheran Church Christian Day School

Prince Edward County
23. Prince Edward County Public Schools
24. R. R. Moton High School
25. Farmville Female Seminary Association
26. First Baptist Church
27. Beulah AME Church
28. Hampden-Sydney College

Charlotte County
29. Southside Virginia Community College - John H. Daniel Campus
30. Charlotte County Library
31. Salem School

Halifax County
32. Meadville Community Center
33. Mary M. Bethune High School
34. Washington-Coleman Elementary School
35. Mizpah Church

Mecklenburg County
36. Thyne Institute
37. Boydton Academic and Bible Institute

Brunswick County
38. Southside Virginia Community College - Christanna Campus
39. Saint Paul's College
40. Hospital and School of the Good Shepherd
41. Fort Christanna
behalf of better relations and understanding between whites and African Americans and his pioneer work in promoting regional centers of education in the South were of immense significance. His photographs and papers were donated after his death to the University of Virginia Library.

(sidebar)
(Right) Jackson Davis photograph of an exhibit in Cumberland Court House.

(Below and Far Right) Portraits of black teachers taken by Jackson Davis at the Cumberland Courthouse between the years 1913-1945.

(Bottom) Cumberland County native, Jackson Davis, b.1882-d.1947.

Photos courtesy of The Jackson Davis Collection, Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library.
 
Erected by Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail®. (Marker Number 8.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 37° 29.806′ N, 78° 14.695′ W. Marker is in Cumberland, Virginia, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Foster Road and Anderson Highway (U.S. 60), on the left when traveling north on Foster Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cumberland VA 23040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
Jackson Davis CRIEHT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 25, 2009
3. Jackson Davis CRIEHT Marker
8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Call For Independence (within shouting distance of this marker); Cumberland County Court House (within shouting distance of this marker); Campaign of 1781 (approx. 2.4 miles away); Buckingham County / Cumberland County (approx. 5.8 miles away); Cumberland County / Powhatan County (approx. 6.7 miles away); a different marker also named Cumberland County / Powhatan County (approx. 8.1 miles away); Robert Bolling (approx. 8.7 miles away); Derwent (approx. 9.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cumberland.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail. (Submitted on July 27, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. University of Virginia Library. Jackson Davis Collection of African American Educational Photographs. (Submitted on July 27, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducation
 
Future home of the Cumberland County Museum. image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 25, 2009
4. Future home of the Cumberland County Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 27, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 884 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 27, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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