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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairmont in Marion County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge

 
 
High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
1. High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker
Inscription. Completed in 1921, honoring WWI veterans. Designed by Concrete Steel Engineering Co., NY; built by John F. Casey Co., Pittsburgh. Three 250 ft. reinforced concrete arch spans, 90 ft. above river, 1,266 ft. long. Connected Fairmont by trolley, foot and vehicle. Listed on National Register, 1991, renamed in honor of Congressman Mollohanís public service, and restored in 2000.
 
Erected 2004 by Main Street Fairmont and the West Virginia Division of Archives and History.
 
Location. 39° 28.875′ N, 80° 8.325′ W. Marker is in Fairmont, West Virginia, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of Merchant Street (West Virginia Route 73) and Jefferson Street, on the left when traveling north on Merchant Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fairmont WV 26554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle for the Bridge (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Attack on Fairmont (approx. 0.2 miles away); A. Brooks Fleming House (approx. ľ mile away); a different marker also named High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge
High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
2. High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker
(approx. ľ mile away); Fairmont (approx. 0.3 miles away); Marion County Courthouse (approx. 0.3 miles away); Boaz Fleming (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fairmont.
 
More about this marker. There are two copies of this marker, one on each end of the bridge. This is the eastern historical marker. Look at the page for the western historical marker for more photographs and information on the electric streetcar company that ran trolleys across this bridge.
 
Also see . . .  Jefferson Street Bridge: The “Million Dollar Bridge”. 2003 article by Bill Fortuna in Shotcrete. “Having been used by Fairmont residents for more than 70 years, the Jefferson Street Bridge needed restoration work to ensure the continued safety of the structure. The goal of the restoration project was to take down 80% of the structure with only the original arches remaining intact, reconstruct the bridge with new materials, and retain the same appearance as the original 1921 design.” (Submitted on August 1, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
Originally the Monongahela River Bridge, Now the Robert H. Mollohan–Jefferson Street Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
3. Originally the Monongahela River Bridge, Now the Robert H. Mollohan–Jefferson Street Bridge
View is west towards downtown Fairmont. The Marion County courthouse cupola is in the distance.
Detail on Bridge Builder's Plaque image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
4. Detail on Bridge Builder's Plaque
|←——224 ft.——→|←——261 ft.——→|←——272 ft.——→|←——261 ft.——→|←——257 ft.——→|
West Approach: 4 spans @ 32 ft., 1 span @ 48 ft. — 250 ft. span — 250 ft. span — 250 ft. span — East Approach: 7 spans @ 32 feet.

Each arch consists of two ribs each 14 ft. wide – 5 ft. thick at the center and 9 ft. thick at the ends. The rise above the springing line is 52 ft. – The height of the sidewalk above the water is 95 ft.
Total length of bridge 1275 feet – The width is 56 feet

In the construction of this bridge 34,000 barrels of cement were used – 14,300 tons of sand – 27,000 tons of gravel and 1,623,000 pounds of steel bars and wire, for formwork and other temporary structures – 1,400,000 feet of timber and 350,000 pounds of structural steel were needed.
Bridge Builder's Plaque at Base of Flagpole image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
5. Bridge Builder's Plaque at Base of Flagpole
“John F. Casey Co., Contractor, Pittsburgh, Pa. John F. Casey, President; S. L. Fuller, Superintendent; Frazier Snyder, General Foreman; Charles Gosner, Master Carpenter; Frank X. Flanagan, Clerk. Concrete-Steel Engineering Co., Consulting Engineers, New York, N.Y. William Mueser, Supervising Engineer; E. H. Harder, Assistant Engineer; Charles F. Bornefeld, Resident Engineer. Henry Hornbostel, Consulting Architect, New York, N.Y.”
Fairmont High Level Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
6. Fairmont High Level Bridge
“At its opening in May 1921 it was called The Million Dollar Bridge. It has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.”
The Robert H. Mollohan Jefferson Street Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
7. The Robert H. Mollohan Jefferson Street Bridge
Initiated in 1996, restoration of Fairmontís 1921 “Million Dollar Bridge” on Jefferson Street was funded with federal assistance from Congressman Alan B. Mollohan. Through a resolution of City Council dated October 10, 2000 and an Act of the West Virginia Legislature in 2001, the bridge was renamed in honor of Congressman Robert H. Mollohan, who represented West Virginiaís First Congressional District from 1953—57 and 1969–83. The Robert H. Mollohan Bridge stands as a tribute to Fairmontís past and as a commitment to its future. Through the leadership of Congressman Alan B. Mollohan; Governor Gaston Caperton; Mayor Nick L. Fantasia; WV Transportation Secretary Fred VanKirk; City Manager Bruce McDaniel; Dr. Emory Kemp; East-West Committee: Janice Cosco, Col. Curt Haley, Mary Sutton. Dedicated October 2000 by Governor Cecil H. Underwood. Design & Engineering by HNTB Architects, Engineers and Planners. Contractor: Mosites Construction. Bridge renaming December 2002 by Governor Robert E. Wise, Jr.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,133 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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