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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812

 
 
National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2003
1. National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812 Marker
Inscription.
Among
the illustrious men
interred within this enclosure who
assisted in the achievement of
National Independence
in the
Revolution and War of 1812

are the following

Samuel Chase, 1741 – 1811, Signer of the Declaration of Independence
Colonel John Eager Howard, 1752 – 1827, Hero of the Battle of Cowpens, 1781
† † Governor of Maryland 1831-1833
Colonel Tench Tilghman, 1744 – 1786, who as General Washingtonís aide-de-camp bore the sword of the surrendered Cornwallis from Yorktown to Congress at Philadelphia with the first news of peace at the close of the Revolution, Oct. 23, 1781
Lieut. Griffith Evans, 1780 – 1816, Deer Creek Batallion, Harford Co., Md.
Major Richard K. Heath, 5th Regt. who commanded the advance guard which attacked the British forces and led to the death of General Robert Ross before the Battle of North Point on Sept. 12, 1814
Daniel Bowley, 1744 – 1807, Officer Md. Militia at the Battle of Monmouth
Lieut. Jacob Walsh
Lieut. Samuel Jennings

Alexander Stevenson, 1788 – 1824, 5th Regt. at North Point
C. A. Callendar, 1784 – 1872, Independent Artillery Fort McHenry
1780 – Colonel George Armistead – 1818
Commander of Fort McHenry during the British
Marker at Baltimore's Old Saint Paulís Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2003
2. Marker at Baltimore's Old Saint Paulís Cemetery
bombardment Sept. 13-14, 1814, and in Greenmount Cemetery his brother-in-law Christopher Hughes, 1786 – 1884, Secretary to the Commissioners at Ghent who brought the first news of peace to America at the close of the War of 1812
Here also within the Howard vault from 1843 to 1866 rested the remains of
1780 – Francis Scott Key – 1843
Author of the National Anthem
---------------
Erected by the National Star Spangled Banner Centennial Commission
September 1914

 
Erected 1914 by National Star Spangled Banner Centennial Commission.
 
Location. 39° 17.297′ N, 76° 37.64′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is on W. Redwood Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is on the wall to the left of the entrance to Old Saint Paulís Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 733 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore MD 21201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead (a few steps from this marker); First Dental College (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Baltimore Infirmary (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bernard von Kapff
Armistead Grave image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 19, 2003
3. Armistead Grave
In this tomb rest Colonel George Armistead, Commander of Fort McHenry, and his nephew Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, CSA, who died in Gettysburg after Pickett's Charge.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Local Hero, National Leader (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Carriage Gates of Westminster Burying Ground (approx. 0.2 miles away); James McHenry, M.D. (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Gilmors (approx. ľ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar of 1812War, US Revolutionary
 
Howard Vault image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 18, 2003
4. Howard Vault
In this vault lies Colonel John Eager Howard, Revolutionary War hero. This vault also held the remains of Francis Scott Key.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,342 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 3, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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