Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Cabildo

National Historic Landmark

 

—Louisiana State Museum —

 
The Cabildo Marker - Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
1. The Cabildo Marker - Panel 1
Inscription.
[Panel 1:]
Erected 1795-1799,
Don Gilberto Guillemard, architect.
Constructed financed and directed by Don Andres Almonester y Roxas.
The mansard roof was added in 1847.

The illustrious Cabildo (Spanish colonial city council) held its sessions here in the Sala Capitular from May 10, 1799 until Nov. 30, 1803. The building housed the city hall of New Orleans, 1803-1853, and the supreme court of Louisiana, 1853-1910.

Until 1914, the prison at the rear was used as a jail servicing the police station on the first floor.

Louisiana State Museum since 1911.

Here on December 20, 1803, were signed the documents transferring the Louisiana Purchase Territory from France to the United States. In 1825 the Cabildo was converted into a fine residence for the visiting General Lafayette.

On this site stood a French colonial Corps de Garde [police station] - 1724 - and a prison and criminal court room (chambre criminelle) - 1730.

The Corps de Garde, rebuilt in 1751, burned in 1788. The remains of its massive brick walls were incorporated in the present Cabildo building in 1795.

The first Cabildo building was constructed here in 1769 by the Spanish governor, Don Alexandro O’Reilly and destroyed in the conflagration of March 21, 1788. Restored 1966-1970 for
The Cabildo Marker - Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
2. The Cabildo Marker - Panel 2
the Louisiana State Museum.

Orleans Parish Landmark Commission: Leonard V. Huber, President; Raymond A. Mix; Harold J. Smith. Jr.; Gasper J. Schird; Sidney L. Villeré; Samuel Wilson, Jr.

Logo of the Orleans Parish Landmarks Commission

[Panel 2:]
The Cabildo has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark.
Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935, this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating and illustration the history of the United States.
U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
 
Erected 1963 by the Orleans Parish Landmarks Commission and the National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 29° 57.452′ N, 90° 3.83′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Chartres Street and St. Peter Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. The marker panels are on the wall near the building's main (Louisiana State Museum) entrance, off the Chartres Street sidewalk, across from Jackson Square. Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 Chartres Street, New Orleans LA 70116, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Cabildo Marker Panel 2 - seen together with adjacent State of Louisiana markers image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
3. The Cabildo Marker Panel 2 - seen together with adjacent State of Louisiana markers
for restoration projects completed in 1970 and 1994.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. David Bannister Morgan (a few steps from this marker); Upper Pontabla Building (a few steps from this marker); Literary Landmark (within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson Square - Vieux Carré (within shouting distance of this marker); Victor David House (within shouting distance of this marker); Quartier General de la Garde Municipale (within shouting distance of this marker); Commagère – Mercier House (within shouting distance of this marker); Cathedral of St. Louis, King of France (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The Homer Adolph Plessy Marker
 
Also see . . .  Louisiana State Museum. The Louisiana State Museum also occupies the Presbytère, the Cabildo's twin edifice on the opposite side of the St. Louis Cathedral, and manages other Landmark buildings adjacent to Jackson Square. (Submitted on August 10, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Franco-Americans; Creoles; Homer A. Plessy; Presbytère.
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
The Cabildo - present headquarters of the Louisiana State Museum image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
4. The Cabildo - present headquarters of the Louisiana State Museum
Plessy vs. Ferguson - interior Louisiana State Museum panel image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
5. Plessy vs. Ferguson - interior Louisiana State Museum panel
describing the Louisiana Supreme Court's landmark decision (rendered in the Cabildo building in 1892 and subsequently upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court) sanctioning the state's laws requiring racial segregation in public facilities under the doctrine of "separate but equal" - a hypocritical policy of discrimination that remained in effect in many states until the mid-20th century.
The Cabildo, adjacent to St. Louis Cathedral with the Presbytère at far right image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
6. The Cabildo, adjacent to St. Louis Cathedral with the Presbytère at far right
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 10, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,992 times since then and 79 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 10, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on August 11, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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