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Hancocks Bridge in Salem County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hancock House Massacre

 
 
Hancock House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2009
1. Hancock House Marker
Inscription. The winter of 1777 – 1778 had been particularly harsh on both the British and the Colonial troops. British commanders learned that the rich agricultural supplies in lower New Jersey could be obtained with little resistance and sent detachments to obtain provisions and supplies.

The colonists were determined to prevent the British from gaining access to their provisions, and moved their livestock below Alloways Creek. British Commander, Colonel Charles Mawhood was just as determined to not only obtain them, but to also “chastise the rebels.” His foraging parties, however, were turned back at all of the bridge crossings by the entrenched Cumberland and Salem militia.

After two days of skirmishing, Colonel Mawhood, more determined than ever to defeat the militia, chose the community around Hancock’s Bridge to concentrate his efforts. Major John G. Simcoe was dispatched with a force of 300 trained guerilla fighters and orders to spare no one.

In the darkness of the early morning hours of March 21, 1778, Simcoe’s troops quietly surrounded Judge William Hancock’s house where a small Quaker garrison of about 30 colonial militia, including Judge Hancock, were sleeping. Simcoe’s troops entered the house simultaneously from the front and back and in the darkness of the night, quickly bayoneted all occupants.
Markers at the Hancock House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2009
2. Markers at the Hancock House
Hancock House is part of the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. The Hancock House marker is on the left, while the other marker describes the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail program. The back of the Hancock House can be seen behind the markers.
Some survived, but unfortunately one of the casualties turned out to be Judge Hancock.
 
Erected by State of New Jersey Division of Parks & Forestry and National Park System.
 
Location. 39° 30.46′ N, 75° 27.584′ W. Marker is in Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey, in Salem County. Marker is at the intersection of New Street and Locust Island Road, on the right when traveling south on New Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hancocks Bridge NJ 08038, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hancock House (within shouting distance of this marker); Patterned Brick Houses (within shouting distance of this marker); Swedish Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriots Massacred in the Hancock House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Alloway Creek Watershed (about 500 feet away); Old Bridges at this Location (about 500 feet away); Waving Acres of Grass (about 500 feet away); Quinton’s Bridge (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hancocks Bridge.
 
More about this marker. Two photographs, courtesy of the Salem County Historical Society, appear on the bottom of the marker. One is of a model of the Quinton
Hancock House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2009
3. Hancock House
This photo shows the front of the Hancock House, located at 3 Front Street near Hancock's Bridge.
bridge and has a caption of, “The Quinton drawbridge was one of several crossings the British attempted to use to gain access to provisions below Alloways Creek. The original was cut down by colonial militia to protect their supplies and provisions, while under British attack the morning of March 18, 1778.” The other is a photograph of the Hancock House showing the brickwork design. It has a caption of “The initials of William Hancock and his wife Sarah Thompson Hancock, along with the date 1734, appear in the patterned end brickwork on the west wall of the house. The decorative brick reflects the building traditions of the Quakers’ English homeland.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Hancock House. New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry webpage. (Submitted on August 13, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 13, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable EventsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Detail of Hancock House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2009
4. Detail of Hancock House
The decorative brickwork of the Hancock House shows William and Sarah Hancock's initials and the date the house was constucted.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,389 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 13, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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