Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Paola in Miami County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

City Hall Fire Bell

 
 
City Hall Fire Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, August 9, 2009
1. City Hall Fire Bell Marker
Inscription. Paola's Volunteer Fire Company, like many others in the midwest, was formed after the great Chicago Fire in 1871. There were no telephones, sirens or radios to notify the firefighters. In 1876, this 400 lb. "nice toned" alarm bell was bought for $150.

When a fire was reported, first a general alarm was sounded. The bell then rang the number of times that corresponded to the district where the fire was burning. Firefighters rushed to that area in search of the fire.

Paola, incorporated in 1855 by the First Kansas Territorial Legislature, is one of Kansas' oldest cities. Originally used as a "lock up and morgue", the City Hall property at Peoria and Agate has been owned by the city since 1873.

Washburn & Sons Architects designed the current City Hall, which cost $9,905 to build in 1909. The bell was erected in the cupola.

After many years of service, the Fire Bell was replaced first by a siren and then by a special telephone party line that the switchboard operator used to alert firefighters. The Fire Bell was restored on this site in 2004.

Thanks to Doherty Ornamental Iron and Wilson & Son Funeral Home for donations to the restoration.
 
Erected 2004.
 
Location. 38° 34.347′ 
Plaque Located on North Side image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, August 9, 2009
2. Plaque Located on North Side
Memorial Plaque
Jill Ann
Holmes
Paola City Clerk
1976 - 2004
N, 94° 52.6′ W. Marker is in Paola, Kansas, in Miami County. Marker is at the intersection of East Peoria Street and South Agate Street, on the left when traveling west on East Peoria Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 19 East Peoria Street, Paola KS 66071, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Paola Veterans' Memorial (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Baptiste & Mary Ann Peoria (about 600 feet away); Miami County History (approx. 0.2 miles away); Miami County Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); Original Land Office (approx. 6.4 miles away); The Potawatomi Trail of Death (approx. 6.4 miles away); John Brown Country (approx. 6.4 miles away); Land Office (approx. 6.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Paola.
 
More about this marker. This marker is on the City Hall property on the east side along Agate Street. There is plenty of parking across Peoria Street.
 
Also see . . .
1. City of Paola. Offical website to the City of Paola, Kansas. (Submitted on August 16, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas.) 

2. Kansas Bogus Legislature. This link details the history and laws enacted of the First Kansas Territorial
Full Photo of Marker and Bell image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, August 9, 2009
3. Full Photo of Marker and Bell
Legislature. also known as the "Bogus Legislature", due to so many many Missourians crossing into Kansas and voting in the election. (Submitted on August 16, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas.) 

3. Buckeye Bell Foundry. Some added information about the "Buckeye Bell Foundry" history with some photos. (Submitted on August 20, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentSettlements & Settlers
 
City Hall Fire Bell image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, August 9, 2009
4. City Hall Fire Bell
Cast by the Buckeye Bell Foundry in 1876.
Paola City Hall image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Onions, August 9, 2009
5. Paola City Hall
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 16, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas. This page has been viewed 775 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 16, 2009, by Thomas Onions of Olathe, Kansas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement