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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Dolly Madison House

 
 
The Dolly Madison House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. The Dolly Madison House Marker
Inscription.
Site of dwelling house
owned by
Ex-President of the United States
James Madison
1828 to 1836
————
Home of his widow
Mrs. Dolly Payne Madison
1837 to 1849
————
Home of
Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes, U.S.N.
and family
1851 to 1886
(lower plaque):
Federal
Judicial Center
The Dolly Madison House
Restored 1968
Lyndon B. Johnson, President

 
Location. 38° 54.005′ N, 77° 2.095′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of H Street, N.W. and Madison Place, on the right when traveling east on H Street, N.W.. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1520 H St NW, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fleeing the Executive Mansion (a few steps from this marker); The Cosmos Club (within shouting distance of this marker); Kosciuszko (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tayloe House (within shouting distance of this marker); Ashburton House (within shouting distance of this marker);
Dolley Madison House image. Click for full size.
2. Dolley Madison House
The markers can be seen on the left side of the house.
Wormley's Hotel Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Freedman’s Savings And Trust (about 400 feet away); St. John's Church (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown.
 
More about this marker. There appears to be a spelling error on these plaques. The First Lady married to President James Madison spelled her name Dolley—not Dolly. —Ed.
 
Also see . . .
1. Biography of Dolley Madison. (Submitted on August 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Biography of Admiral Charles Wilkes. Admiral Wilkes had a colorful career. Credited by some with the discovery of Antarctica, he also charted the Hawaiian Islands. During the Civil War, his ship intercepted the British ship “Trent,” which was carrying Confederate diplomats, leading to an international incident. Wilkes was actually court marshaled later for insubordinate remarks against the Secretary of the Navy. (Submitted on August 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. General George McClellan’s Headquarters. During his tenure as commander of the Union armies in the Civil War, George
Dolley Madison image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. Dolley Madison
This 1848 portrait of Dolley Madison hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Dolley Madison served as White House hostess during the administrations of the widowed Thomas Jefferson and her own husband, James Madison. Her effervescence doubtless accounted, in part at least, for the popularity of Madison's presidency in its last several years. After the end of Madison's term in 1817, Dolley helped her husband put his papers in order, selling a portion of them to Congress after his death.

William Elwell painted Dolley Madison's portrait in February 1848 and later sold it to her longtime friend William Winston Seaton, editor and co-owner of the Washington, D.C., newspaper The National Intelligencer. The portrait offers a glimpse of the aging Mrs. Madison, described by the artist in his diary as ‘a very Estimable lady—kind & obliging—one of the Old School.’” — National Portrait Gallery
McClellan maintained his headquarters at the house of his friend, Admiral Wilkes. (Submitted on August 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Cutts-Madison House. Wikipedia (Submitted on August 21, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
The Dolley Madison House image. Click for full size.
4. The Dolley Madison House
The Cutts House, 1822 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. The Cutts House, 1822
This detail of a sketch by Baroness Hyde de Neuville shows the Cutts house as it appeared in 1822 on what was then called President's Square.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 7,482 times since then and 113 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 27, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 21, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 28, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on October 21, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 21, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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