Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

French Market

 
 
French Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
1. French Market Marker
Inscription.
In 1991 in celebration of the bicentennial of its first market hall, the French Market rededicates itself to the perpetuation and expansion of the traditional market offerings of the bounty of Louisiana - its land, its waters, its cultures - in endless variety.

Native Americans traded here from ancient times when waterways were the highways of America. The market on the banks of the river linked the Mississippi Valley with the Gulf Coast by way of the Esplanade Ridge to Bayou St. John and through Lake Pontchartrain to the Gulf of Mexico. After the arrival of the French the market on the levee grew to include the products of the world as New Orleans grew around it. In 1791, the Spanish city government established a city market and built the first market hall, a butchers’ market at St. Ann Street and the river. Over two centuries, many buildings have been built, and some have been lost to fire, hurricane and the changing economy. The market became known as the French Market with the arrival of the Anglo-Americans who named old things in the old city French, but other cultures contributed to the market. Africans, Spanish, Haitians, Italians, Germans, Irish, Jews, Dalmations, Greeks, Syrians, Lebanese, Filipinos, Chinese, other Asians, Latin Americans, and many more. Colonial New Orleans was Caribbean Creole, enriched by the
French Market Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 14, 2009
2. French Market Marker
It is visible behind the fire hydrant, to the right of the market entrance.
Acadian agricultural community giving the city and market the cuisine, the music and the style which make them unique. Changes in the technology for the production and distribution of food in this century changed the market, but as the cycle of change continues, the joy and vitality of the traditional market regain prominence.

French Market Corporation

Board of Directors:
Albert S. Pappalardo, President
Karin P. Dumas, Vice President
Gloria Fermin, Secretary
Charles Malachias, Treasurer
Margarita Bergen
Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson
Joseph I. Ciarrusso
Irma Ruth Gomez
Jerome T. Medley, M.D.
Anthony J. Saladino
Eugenie C. Schwartz
Dorothy Mae Taylor

Executive Director
Luis Costa

Deputy Director
Jezelle Hebert

City of New Orleans

Mayor Sidney J. Barthelemy

City Council:
Joseph L. Ciarruso
Dorothy Mae Taylor
Lambert Boissiere, Jr.
Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson
Johnny Jackson, Jr
. James Singleton
Peggy Wilson

Chief Administrative Officer
Leonard D. Simmons, Jr.

Executive Assistant to the Mayor
Alfred A. Stokes

 
Erected 1991 by French Market Corporation.
 
Location.
The Market Cafe (decorated for Bastille Day celebration) at the south end of the French Market image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 15, 2009
3. The Market Cafe (decorated for Bastille Day celebration) at the south end of the French Market
29° 57.581′ N, 90° 3.575′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker is on Ursulines Avenue east of N. Peters Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. At the market entrance between N. Peter Street and French Market Place. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1008 N. Peters Street, New Orleans LA 70116, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The French Market (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Ursuline Convent (about 500 feet away); Provincial Motel (about 500 feet away); Archbishop Antoine Blanc Memorial (about 500 feet away); Le – Carpentier/Beauregard House (about 600 feet away); Birthplace of Danny Barker (about 700 feet away); Evans Creole Candy Factory (approx. 0.2 miles away); De La Ronde House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Also see . . .  Art in New Orleans - Joan of Arc statue. (Submitted on August 22, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Place de France
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USColonial EraIndustry & CommerceNotable Places
 
"St. Joan of Arc, Maid of Orleans" - statue in Place de France image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 15, 2009
4. "St. Joan of Arc, Maid of Orleans" - statue in Place de France
This statue is an exact copy of the 1880 Emmanuel Fremiet statue of Joan at Place des Pyramides, Paris. Originally located in front of the International Trade Mart building in uptown New Orleans, it was moved in 1999 to the "Place de France" next to the French Market on Decatur Street, south of the Market Cafe.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 21, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,507 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 21, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 22, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement