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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stafford in Stafford County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

From Indian Path to Highway

 
 
From Indian Path to Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, August 28, 2007
1. From Indian Path to Highway Marker
Inscription. In 1664, a colonial road here probably followed the trace of an old Indian path. Two years later, the road was extended to Aquia Creek. It became a post road in 1750, and in Sept. 1781 Gen. George Washington passed over it on the march to Yorktown. By 1900, a crude dirt road followed this route. The 1914 American Automobile Association Blue Book described it as mostly “very poor and dangerous; should not be attempted except in dry weather.” By 1925, auto camps and cabins, the predecessors of auto courts and motels, stood at frequent intervals along present-day U.S. Route 1 between Washington, D.C., and Richmond.
 
Erected 1998 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number E-50.)
 
Location. 38° 24.164′ N, 77° 25.252′ W. Marker is in Stafford, Virginia, in Stafford County. Marker is on Jefferson Davis Highway (U.S. Rt 1), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stafford VA 22554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stafford Training School (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Trooper Jessica Jean Cheney (approx. 0.8 miles away); 11th Corps Road
From Indian Path to Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin White, August 28, 2007
2. From Indian Path to Highway Marker
(approx. one mile away); Union Army Double-Track Corduroy Road (approx. one mile away); German-Americans and the Eleventh Corps (approx. one mile away); Union Battery (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Union Battery (approx. one mile away); The Daniel Bridge (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stafford.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced one with the same number but titled “Indian Trail” erected in the late 1920s or early 1930s that read, “Here ran the original Indian trail. In 1664 a road was opened here and in 1666 it was extended to Aquia Creek. In 1750 this became a post road. In September, 1781, Washington passed over this road on the way to Yorktown, and over it the French army later marched north.”
 
Also see . . .  What Route 1 was like in 1919. A picture postcard from the Prince William Public Library System Digital Library. Caption of postcard is: This is how it was in 1919 for travelers between Richmond and Washington along what later was to become US Route 1. Shown is the Dumfries area in Prince William County... (Submitted on August 28, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyColonial EraNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismRoads & VehiclesWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,765 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 28, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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