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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pine Mountain in Harris County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

This Was His Georgia

 
 
This Was His Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
1. This Was His Georgia Marker
Inscription. Franklin D. Roosevelt was a frequent visitor (41 trips) to Warm Springs from 1924-1945. Dowdell’s Knob was one of his favorite spots for both quiet contemplation and picnics. F.D.R. visited this spot overlooking Pine Mountain Valley as a private citizen, as governor of New York and as 32nd president of the U.S.

He wanted more people to visit the area and urged the building of the scenic highway across Pine Mt. and the construction of the spur here (1937).

President Roosevelt had the grill built to help him enjoy picnics in his more formal style. He preferred linen-draped tables with hot dishes served from silver. In place of a blanket he preferred to sit on a chair or on an automobile seat placed on the ground.

F.D.R. came here to contemplate the upcoming founding of the United Nations and the Americans dying on Okinawa and in Germany during his final trip to Warm Springs, April, 1945.
 
Erected 1984 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 072-7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 50.421′ N, 84° 44.717′ W. Marker is near Pine Mountain, Georgia, in Harris County. Marker
This Was His Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
2. This Was His Georgia Marker
Picnic tables and the trailhead for a portion of the Pine Mountain Trail are visible
is on Dowdell Knob Road 1.3 miles south of Georgia Route 190, in the median. Touch for map. Dowdell's Knob is part of the F. D. Roosevelt State Park. The intersection with the road to the Knob is well marked, and the gated road is typically open only during daylight hours. Marker is in this post office area: Pine Mountain GA 31822, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Franklin D. Roosevelt (a few steps from this marker); Dowdell's Knob (approx. 1.3 miles away); Longleaf Pine Planting (approx. 2.6 miles away); Roosevelt Farm (approx. 2.7 miles away); Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Bridge (approx. 3.7 miles away); Franklin Delano Roosevelt (approx. 4.4 miles away); The Little White House (approx. 4½ miles away); Warm Springs Treatment Pools (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pine Mountain.
 
More about this marker. The marker replaced an earlier marker with a similar title but substantially different text. That marker was erected in 1957 by the Georgia Historical Commission, and was located near this marker. The text of the original marker (see picture below) read,

During the 21 years (1924–1945) in which he was a constant visitor to Warm Springs, GA.,
Franklin D. Roosevelt
became familiar with the scenic
This Was His Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
3. This Was His Georgia Marker
An interpretive sign is to the left, and the statue of Roosevelt to the right by a tree
beauties of field & forest in the environs. The splendid isolation of Dowdell’s Knob, with its vista of valley & cloud-land, was his favorite resort for recreation — an item of which was the outdoor fireplace, a monument to his further pleasure in the Georgia scene.

One of his last days was marked by a visit here in the glad April, for quiet contemplation and reverie — as weary Pilgrims of old came to the Delectable Mountains.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The old marker which stood at this location.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyGovernmentLandmarksNatural FeaturesPoliticsWar, World II
 
This Was His Georgia Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
4. This Was His Georgia Marker
The Roosevelt statue in the foreground with the marker in the background
Roosevelt and Dowdell's Knob Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
5. Roosevelt and Dowdell's Knob Interpretive Sign
Statue of F. D. Roosevelt image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
6. Statue of F. D. Roosevelt
The statue depicts Roosevelt seated on the car seat from his car, his habit at Dowdell's Knob as described by the marker
Roosevelt's Barbeque image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
7. Roosevelt's Barbeque
The grille was removed from the barbeque and the area filled in with cement to avoid vandalism
Roosevelt's Barbeque and the View from Dowdell's Knob image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
8. Roosevelt's Barbeque and the View from Dowdell's Knob
Marker on the Roosevelt Barbeque image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
9. Marker on the Roosevelt Barbeque
This Was His Georgia image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
10. This Was His Georgia
The view from Dowdell's Knob, looking south at Pine Mountain Valley
Original “This Was His Georgia” Marker at Dowdell’s Knob image. Click for more information.
J. J. Prats Postcard Collection. “Color Photo by McElvain”
11. Original “This Was His Georgia” Marker at Dowdell’s Knob
Undated postcard has this legend “Franklin D. Roosevelt State Park on U.S. 27, three miles south of Pine Mountain, Ga. • Historical marker at the site where President Roosevelt often picnicked with family and friends. At lower left is stone grill that he used on such outings.” A ‘True-to-Life’ Natural Color Card by Florida Pre-Vues, New Port Richey, Florida — #4961-24
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,180 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on August 28, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   11. submitted on June 28, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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