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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Oak Grove in Westmoreland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

George Washington’s Birthplace

(Wakefield)

 
 
George Washington’s Birthplace Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
1. George Washington’s Birthplace Marker
Inscription. George Washington’s birthplace is two miles north, on Pope’s Creek, just off the Potomac River. He was born on 22 Feb. 1732 and lived there only for three years. Washington’s father, Augustine, purchased the land in 1718 and built the house by 1726. President Washington s half-brother Augustine, Jr., inherited the property after his father’s death in 1743. The dwelling, a U-shaped timber-frame house, burned on Christmas Day 1779. The present Memorial House, erected in 1930–31 is a Colonial Revival-style version of a medium-size planter’s house. Originally known as Pope s Creek, the property was renamed Wakefield about 1770 by George Washington’s half- nephew William Augustine Washington.
 
Erected 2000 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number J-69.)
 
Location. 38° 10.326′ N, 76° 56.917′ W. Marker is near Oak Grove, Virginia, in Westmoreland County. Marker is at the intersection of Kings Highway (Virginia Route 3) and Popes Creek Drive (Virginia Route 204), on the left when traveling east on Kings Highway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Colonial Beach VA 22443, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. George Washington Birthplace Site
George Washington’s Birthplace Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
2. George Washington’s Birthplace Marker
This view is north. Route 3 is behind the photographer.
(approx. 1.8 miles away); “O! say can you see…” (approx. 1.8 miles away); Free to Fight (approx. 1.8 miles away); War in the Chesapeake (approx. 1.8 miles away); Explore a trail network (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Historic Area (approx. 1.8 miles away); The Burial Ground (approx. 1.9 miles away); Popes Creek Plantation (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
Regarding George Washington’s Birthplace. Use the link to the map (under Location, above), switch to satellite view, and zoom in to see clear overhead photographs of the obelisk, current memorial house, and grounds.
 
Also see . . .  George Washington Birthplace National Monument. “When Augustine Washington died in 1743, the bulk of his estate went to the two sons of his first marriage. George Washington did not inherit much wealth or land, but his father did pass on to him the Washington family’s status as members of the landed gentry and its commitment to public service. George Washington’s half-brother Augustine Jr. inherited the Pope’s Creek plantation when his father died in 1743 and eventually willed it to his son, William. George Washington frequently returned to Popes
George Washington’s Birthplace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Susan Dumler, August 7, 2010
3. George Washington’s Birthplace Marker
Creek throughout his adolescence to learn practical farming and to assist with the responsibilities of running the plantation. William named the property Wakefield and owned the house until it burned down on Christmas Day, 1779.” (Submitted on September 3, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable Places
 
George Washington’s Birthplace Obelisk image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
4. George Washington’s Birthplace Obelisk
Popes Creek Drive runs perfectly straight for 1.7 miles between Kings Highway and the obelisk. To the right is the Visitor’s center.
George Washington’s Birthplace Visitor’s Center image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
5. George Washington’s Birthplace Visitor’s Center
Park, pay inside, then wander the grounds. The back of the visitor’s center faces Pope’s Creek and the Potomac River.
George Washington’s Birthplace Memorial Shaft image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
6. George Washington’s Birthplace Memorial Shaft
In the 1890s Congress donated this 50-foot obelisk and erected it on the site where people then thought were the remains of the birth house. The foundations of the house were unearthed in 1936, closer to the river. The obelisk has no writing on any of its faces. Made of Vermont marble, it is a one-tenth scale replica of the Washington Monument that is in Washington, D.C.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,324 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 3, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on September 16, 2010, by Susan Dumler of Mechanicsville, Maryland.   4, 5, 6. submitted on September 3, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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