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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

This Boulder Marks the National Trail

 

—General Braddock Monument —

 
National Trail Tablet image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
1. National Trail Tablet
Inscription. This boulder marks the National Trail over which traveled Gen. Edward Braddock and Lieutenant Colonel George Washington 1755.
 
Erected 1924 by the Frederick Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Braddock’s Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock, and the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 39° 25.324′ N, 77° 29.913′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Old National Pike (Alternate U.S. 40) east of Urner Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21702, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hagan’s Tavern (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Braddock-Washington Monument (approx. half a mile away); General Edward Braddock (approx. 1.9 miles away); Woodmere (approx. 2.3 miles away); Christ Reformed Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Middletown (approx. 2.9 miles away); The Arnett Building (approx. 2.9 miles away); The Coblentz-Long Building (approx. 2.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. An art nouveau typeface is used for the inscription below
National Trail Boulder image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. National Trail Boulder
a bas-relief of Washington and Braddock standing, and a third figure resting on his knees behind Braddock. Perhaps this third figure is the Delaware Indian Chief Nemacolin, who blazed the original trail from Cumberland to the Monongahela river.
 
Also see . . .
1. Braddock monument moved. This article by Karen Gardner was originally published in the Frederick News-Post on August 26, 2009. (Submitted on September 24, 2009.) 

2. Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture, Smithsonian American Art Museum. Braddock-Washington Monument, (sculpture). (Submitted on June 16, 2012.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker History and Preservation Efforts
The memorial was proposed in 1913 and the Frederick Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution sponsored lectures and card parties, and purchased a Liberty bond, eventually raising $754.54 to erect the memorial. The bronze relief tablet by sculptor Edward Berge is mounted on a large boulder taken from Braddock Mountain and placed by the Grove Lime Company. The Daughters of the American Revolution dedicated the monument on June 14, 1924 as part of their effort to mark the old trails west.

The tablet depicts British General Edward Braddock, his aide Lieutenant Colonel George Washington, and an unnamed third man (kneeling behind Braddock) as they stopped to drink from a spring along the road to Fort Duquesne in 1755 during the French and Indian War.

In 1952, the piece was moved because of road construction and so it would be closer to the spring from which Braddock
Boulder Behind the Guardrail image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
3. Boulder Behind the Guardrail
and Washington drank. The Monuments Commission sponsored conservation treatment in 1994. The bronze was washed and given a protective coating of wax to prevent corrosion.

In August of 2009 the boulder was moved about 1/2 mile west to the old scenic overlook on th ewestern slope of Braddock Heights overlooking Middletown Valley. The new spot is more visible and more accessible to visitors.
    — Submitted November 29, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

 
Categories. Notable PersonsRoads & VehiclesWar, French and Indian
 
Marker, as seen from the road, travelling west image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, March 2, 2008
4. Marker, as seen from the road, travelling west
This Boulder Marks the National Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cindy Stegle, November 16, 2009
5. This Boulder Marks the National Trail Marker
The small tablet reads, “General Braddock Monument rededicated October 11, 2009; Frederick Chapter, DAR.”
Re-dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
6. Re-dedication Plaque
General Braddock Monument
Re-dedicated October 11, 2009
by the Frederick Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
History Of This Boulder Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joe Harness, April 29, 2012
7. History Of This Boulder Historical Marker
Picture Showing Original Location Of This Boulder, From Additional Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joe Harness, April 29, 2012
8. Picture Showing Original Location Of This Boulder, From Additional Marker
This Boulder At New Location With Additional Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joe Harness, April 29, 2012
9. This Boulder At New Location With Additional Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 11, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,888 times since then and 50 times this year. Last updated on September 7, 2009, by Bob Smart of Middletown, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on June 11, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on June 16, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4. submitted on March 2, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   5. submitted on June 17, 2010, by Cindy Stegle of Frederick, Maryland.   6. submitted on April 12, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7, 8, 9. submitted on April 29, 2012, by Joe Harness of Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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