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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West Point in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wars That Shaped the Nation

The Mexican War

 
 
Replacement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 6, 2014
1. Replacement Marker
The text on the new marker varies just slightly from that on the original marker.
Inscription.
The Mexican War increased the nationís size by over 20 percent and continued the rapid territorial expansion of the United States. In 1846, after a number of incidents along the border between Texas and Mexico, the United States declared war against Mexico and rapidly raised an army of volunteers serving under professional officers. An army under Zachary Taylor advanced into Mexico from Texas in 1846. In 1847, General Winfield Scott began the decisive campaign. After landing at Veracruz, Scott proceeded overland, won five battles, and captured Mexico City to end the war.

The war offered many West Pointers their first combat experience and affirmed the Military Academyís role as the nationís preeminent source of professional officers. Many junior officers, including Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, George B. McClellan and others would gain valuable lessons that would guide them later in the Civil War.

The captured trophies from the war displayed here are all bronze and vary only slightly from those used in earlier American conflicts. Markings on the guns indicate that most were made in England in the 1840ís and purchased for the Mexican Army. The largest cannon, a 24-pounder, manned by cadets of the Mexican Military Academy was taken by General Scottís forces at Chapultepec in Mexico City.

Cannon tubes are from
Mexican War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
2. Mexican War Marker
the collections of the West Point Museum which has other Mexican War exhibits on display in its facility at Pershing Center.
 
Location. 41° 23.643′ N, 73° 57.495′ W. Marker is in West Point, New York, in Orange County. Marker is on Washington Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at Trophy Point at the U.S. Military Academy. Marker is in this post office area: West Point NY 10996, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to Trophy Point (a few steps from this marker); U.S. Military Academy (a few steps from this marker); 150 Pounder Armstrong Gun Captured at Fort Fisher, North Carolina – January 15, 1865 (within shouting distance of this marker); 8 Inch (150-pounder) Armstrong Gun (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery Sherburne (within shouting distance of this marker); Beat Navy Tunnel (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonel Thayer (within shouting distance of this marker); Douglas MacArthur (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Point.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Tour the “Wars that shaped the Nation” markers found at Trophy Point at the U.S. Military Academy.
New Mexican War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 6, 2014
3. New Mexican War Marker

 
Categories. War, Mexican-American
 
Marker on Trophy Point image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
4. Marker on Trophy Point
Mexican War Cannons image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
5. Mexican War Cannons
A large collections of captured Mexican War cannons are found in front of the marker.
Closeup of Mexican War Trophies image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
6. Closeup of Mexican War Trophies
These cannon were captured during the Mexican War. They were taken during the Battle of Cerro Gordo on April 18, 1847 (left) and the Battle of Monterey on Sept. 23, 1846 (right).
Mexican War Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
7. Mexican War Cannon
This cannon was captured at Contreras on August 20, 1847.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,050 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 12, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on July 12, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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