Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Shockoe Hill Cemetery

 
 
Shockoe Hill Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
1. Shockoe Hill Cemetery Marker
Inscription. The City of Richmond opened Shockoe Hill Cemetery on four acres in 1822, when the burial ground of St. Johnís Church approached its capacity. By 1871, Shockoe Hill had reached its current size of 12.7 acres. John Marshall (1755-1835), Chief Justice of the United States, and his wife Mary (“Polly”) Willis Ambler Marshall, are interred here. Marshall often walked to the cemetery from his nearby home to visit his wifeís grave after her death in 1831. Revolutionary War hero Peter Francisco, Civil War Union spy Elizabeth Van Lew, Richmond mayors William Foushee and Joseph Mayo, and Virginia governor William H. Cabell are also buried here.
 
Erected 2007 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number SA-4.)
 
Location. 37° 33.143′ N, 77° 25.855′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is on Hospital Street west of North 4th Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Shockoe Hill Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Union POW Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker
Shockoe Hill Cemetery Marker on Hospital Street image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
2. Shockoe Hill Cemetery Marker on Hospital Street
also named Shockoe Hill Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); "The Great Chief Justice" (within shouting distance of this marker); Brown's Island Disaster (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hebrew Cemetery (about 300 feet away); Engine Company No. 9 Fire Station (approx. 0.3 miles away); Saint Joseph Catholic Church (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .
1. Friends of Shockoe Hill Cemetery. (Submitted on September 21, 2009.)
2. The Soldiers of Shockoe Hill. (Submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
3. General Hospital #1. Civil War Richmond. (Submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US CivilWar, US Revolutionary
 
General Hospital Number 1. image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
3. General Hospital Number 1.
The General Hospital, City Home Hospital, Alms House Hospital. Built shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War by the City of Richmond as a poor house. Rented by the City Council to the Confederate authorities in June 1861 as a military hospital. Continued in use as such until December 1864 when it was reclaimed by the City for rental to the Virginia Military Institute as their temporary location. Suffered heavy exterior damage when the nearby powder magazine was exploded on evacuation night. Taken over by Federal authorities and again used by them as a poor house. Returned to the City in December 1865. It was used for many years as the City Alms House. Still in use and owned by the City of Richmond. Earliest use by the Confederacy was for wounded Union prisoners. Soon became the first of the large General Hospitals. Capacity about 500 patients. Dr. Charles Bell Gibson, surgeon-in-charge. [Confederate Military Hospitals in Richmond by Robert W. Wait, Jr., Official Publication #22 Richmond Civil War Centennial Committee, Richmond, Virginia 1964.]
John and Mary Willis Ambler Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
4. John and Mary Willis Ambler Marshall
John Marshall. Son of Thomas and Mary Marshall was born the 24th of September 1755. Intermarried with Mary Willis Ambler the 3rd of January 1783. Departed this life the 6th day of July 1835.
Peter Francisco image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
5. Peter Francisco
Died Jan. 16, 1831. A soldier of Revolutionary fame.
Elizabeth L. Van Lew image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
6. Elizabeth L. Van Lew
1818–1900. She risked everything that is dear to man–friends-fortune-comfort-health-life itself-all for the one absorbing desire of her heart-that slavery might be abolished and the Union preserved. This boulder from the capitol hill in Boston is a tribute from Massachusetts friends.
Dr William Foushee, 1st mayor of Richmond (1782). image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
7. Dr William Foushee, 1st mayor of Richmond (1782).
To the memory of Dr William Foushee. A Virginian by birth. A patriot in his principles. In his manners the accomplished gentleman. He was a distinguished physician and graduated at Edinburgh. So great was the confidence reposed in his skill and so bright and cheering was his countenance, even after the age of three score years and ten, that his very presence at the bed side of the suffering seemed to operate as a balmy medicine upon the heart of the sick. He was born 26th October, 1749 and died 21st August, 1824.
Sally Harrison Pickett image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
8. Sally Harrison Pickett
Sacred to the memory of Sally Harrison. Daughter of Dr. John Minge. And wife of Capt. George E. Pickett, U.S.A. Born August 9th 1829. Died at Fort Gates, Texas, November 13th, 1851.
Charlotte Georgiana Wickham Lee image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
9. Charlotte Georgiana Wickham Lee
Born 1841. Died Dec. 26, 1863. Cherished wife of Gen. W. H. F. Lee. And beloved daughter-in-law of Gen. R. E. Lee. “How sweet her memory”
Johnson Jones Hooper image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
10. Johnson Jones Hooper
of Alabama. June 9, 1815-July 7, 1862. Author-Editor-Lawyer. Secretary, Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America 1861-1862. Erected by his friends Dec. 1950
Richmond City Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Alexander Gardner, April, 186
11. Richmond City Hospital
Library of Congress [LC-B815- 898] Many Union POWs were buried here east of Shockoe Hill Cemetery. The soldiers were later moved to Richmond National Cemetery on Williamsburg Road.
Almshouse, Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
By Alexander Gardner, April 10, 1865
12. Almshouse, Richmond, Va.
Library of Congress [LC-B815- 860]. Used as CSA General Hospital #1. Charles Bell Gibson was the surgeon-in-charge. Shockoe Hill Cemetery is in the foreground.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,676 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement