Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jost Hite and Winchester

 
 
Jost Hite and Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
1. Jost Hite and Winchester Marker
Inscription. German emigrant Jost Hite and about 16 other German and Scots-Irish families from Pennsylvania came to this region in 1732, creating one of the early permanent European settlements. They settled along the Opequon Creek watershed south-west of the present-day city of Winchester. Soon after their arrival, a number of other communities developed regionally, including Fredericktown, present-day Winchester. Winchester was chartered as a town in 1752. It began as a small farming community that developed into a thriving town and important trading center at the junction of several transportation arteries.
 
Erected 2003 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number Q 4-b.)
 
Location. 39° 11.287′ N, 78° 6.737′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Berryville Pike (Virginia Route 7) and Greenwood Road (County Route 656), on the right when traveling east on Berryville Pike. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Third Battle of Winchester (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester
Two Markers at the Intersection of Highway 7 and Route 656 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
2. Two Markers at the Intersection of Highway 7 and Route 656
(approx. 0.4 miles away); The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .
1. Jost Hite’s Story. His final resting place is not precisely known. The grave stone was lost over the years. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Hite Family Tree. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Hite vs. Lord Fairfax. Lord Fairfax considered Hite a “squatter” of sorts and required him to pay rent on the land he occupied. Hite contended his grants, from the state, superseded Fairfax’s claims. The case was not settled until years after both men were dead and buried. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. This land is my land! All 5 million acres of it... A discussion of the Fairfax Grants, with discussion of the Hite-Fairfax legal battle. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

5. The Old Marker. Contrary to what was reported, the original Q–4b marker still stands 2 miles west in Winchester. (Submitted on September 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

6. Winchester City Home Page. (Submitted on September 18, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. The 2000th Marker
This marker is the 2000th marker published in this database. —Ed.
    — Submitted September 2, 2007.

 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,397 times since then and 80 times this year. Last updated on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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