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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Milford in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Falls Bridge

 
 
Falls Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 13, 2009
1. Falls Bridge Marker
Inscription.
By the 1890ís New Milfordís old wooden bridges had outlived their usefulness, considering their age, the increasing amount of traffic and the coming of the horseless carriage. A sturdy and very ornate iron bridge, built by the Berlin Iron Bridge Company, had replaced the covered wooden bridge at Boardmanís crossing in 1888, and itís performance and appearance pleased town officials. In early 1895, Granville M. Breinig, President of the Bridgeport Wood Finishing Company approached the town Selectmen with an attractive proposition. Mr, Breinig indicated that his company used the public road that connected with the old wooden bridge in its operation, and profits were severely impacted by restrictions placed on the bridge. His proposal was to exchange the public road for a new road, which would be built on company land eight rods to the south, and given to the town at no cost. In addition, his company would donate $1000 toward the cost of a new iron bridge. The proposal was unanimously accepted at a town meeting on February 23, 1895. The Falls Bridge was completed the same year at a cost of $7,938.
Facts
Originally known as Falls Bridge or Bridge at Great Falls
Size
19 feet wide, 173 feet long and 100 feet above the gorge and rapids.
Lenticular Truss Design
Built by Berlin Iron Bridge Co., Berlin,
Informational markers along the old road. image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 13, 2009
2. Informational markers along the old road.
In the background is the Falls Bridge.
CT. Over 1000 were built by Berlin Iron Bridge Co. before 1900. One of four of its design still remaining in Connecticut.
Recognition
The National Register of Historic Places in 1976
Historic Highway Bridge designation by CT Department of Transportation
Historic American Engineering Record in Library of Congress
Dedicated June 16, 2007
 
Erected 2007 by Friends of Loverís Leap State Park.
 
Location. 41° 32.631′ N, 73° 24.46′ W. Marker is in New Milford, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker can be reached from Still River Drive 0.2 miles east of Pumpkin Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located on the old road to Falls Bridge in Loverís Leap State Park. Marker is in this post office area: New Milford CT 06776, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Loverís Leap State Park (here, next to this marker); Bridgeport Wood Finishing Company (here, next to this marker); Space Shuttle Tire (approx. 1.6 miles away); Bridgewater WW I Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Bridgewater WW II Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Bridgewater Veterans
The Falls Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 13, 2009
3. The Falls Bridge
(approx. 2.3 miles away); New Milford WW II Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Bridgewater (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Milford.
 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
Falls Bridge Builder's Sign Plate image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 13, 2009
4. Falls Bridge Builder's Sign Plate
Lake Lillinonah from the Falls Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 13, 2009
5. Lake Lillinonah from the Falls Bridge
Before a dam was built to the south to form the lake in 1955, the gorge and rapids were 100 feet below the bridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 25, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,143 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 25, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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