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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Farmington in San Juan County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Footloose in Farmington:

A Historic Perspective of Downtown

 
 
Footloose in Farmington Marker image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
1. Footloose in Farmington Marker
A Historic Perspective of Downtown
Inscription. Farmington, New Mexico, the heart of the Four Corners, boasts a thriving downtown, where character, history and culture fuse in a mixture of places and events. Originally the land in what is now Northwest New Mexico was known as Tóta’  in Navajo, with meaning “water” and ta’ meaning “three,” essentially, “waters, three.” In 1876, this section of the Jicarilla Apache Reservation was opened for settlement by the U.S. government and allowed for the establishment of Farmington. In December 2002, the Farmington Historic Commercial District was officially entered into the National Register for Historic Places. With our colorful history, natural beauty and sense of purpose, Farmington is working to regain its downtown heritage and pride of place.
 
Location. 36° 43.754′ N, 108° 12.33′ W. Marker is in Farmington, New Mexico, in San Juan County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Orchard Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is near the pavilion and fountain in Hunter Plaza on the corner of Orchard and Main. Marker is at or near this postal address: 108 West Main Street, Farmington NM 87401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within
Footloose in Farmington Marker image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
2. Footloose in Farmington Marker
13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Farmington, New Mexico (approx. 0.4 miles away); Harriet Belle Amsden Sammons (1876-1954) (approx. 2.1 miles away); a different marker also named Farmington (approx. 4.3 miles away); Salmon Ruin (approx. 10 miles away); City of Bloomfield (approx. 10.8 miles away); Aztec Ruins National Monument (approx. 12.7 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Most experts disagree that the Navajo word "Tota'" means "waters, three" (three rivers). It actually means "waters [flowing] together", or place where the rivers meet. In Farmington the Animas and LaPlata rivers flow into the San Juan.
 
Regarding Footloose in Farmington:. Approximately 8 blocks of Farmington's downtown area was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on December 20, 2002. It features late 19th and early 20th-century buildings. Farmington has long been the commercial hub of the Four Corners region and has a population nearly 4 times that of Durango, Colorado (50 miles to the north). On weekends many people come to Farmington to do their shopping from the Navajo, Southern Ute, and Apache Reservations and from small towns in a 60-mile radius.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Plaque for Hunter Plaza, Location of "Footloose in Farmington" Marker image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
3. Plaque for Hunter Plaza, Location of "Footloose in Farmington" Marker
“The Hunters arrived in
Farmington in 1891 and donated
The land for this plaza
To the City of Farmington
In May 1902.
This pavilion is dedicated to
the memory of
the Hunters
for their generosity and
community spirit in helping
Farminton grow.
Marker and Gazebo on Main Street image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
4. Marker and Gazebo on Main Street
View of Farmington From Hill Near The Airport image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
5. View of Farmington From Hill Near The Airport
Historic Buildings Near Orchard and Main image. Click for full size.
September 26, 2009
6. Historic Buildings Near Orchard and Main
Navaho Doll, Window Display - Downtown image. Click for full size.
By Mark Lashley, November 15, 2011
7. Navaho Doll, Window Display - Downtown
Cloud Formation, Farmington, New Mexico image. Click for full size.
By Mark Lashley, November 30, 2011
8. Cloud Formation, Farmington, New Mexico
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 30, 2009. This page has been viewed 1,002 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 30, 2009.   7, 8. submitted on December 7, 2011, by Mark Lashley of Austin, Texas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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