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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Pritchard House

A Family Caught in the Midst of War!

 
 
The Pritchard House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
1. The Pritchard House Marker
Inscription. The large brick dwelling before you is the Pritchard House, built by Steven C. Pritchard, Jr. and his son Samuel R. Pritchard. During the Civil War, Samuel, his wife Helen, and their two small children occupied the house. Fighting swirled around the home during the First and Second Battles of Kernstown, as it did during smaller engagements on June 13, 1863, and August 17, 1864. Whenever combat raged across the farmstead, Samuel sheltered his family in the cellar.

When the fighting subsided, the home was used as a field hospital, and Helen Pritchard, a Unionist from New York, personally cared for many wounded Union soldiers in the house. “If it had not been for me,” she recalled, “they would have died...” After Second Kernstown, Confederate soldiers carried the mortally wounded Colonel James A. Mulligan of the Union army into the house. A Confederate surgeon offered what little medical care he could, and a priest from the Louisiana Tiger Brigade gave Mulligan his Last Rites. Two days after the battle, Mulligan died peacefully as Helen Pritchard cradled his head in her arms.

With armies moving up and down the Shenandoah Valley throughout the war, the Pritchard Family (as did most other families) endured the loss of and damage to their property. After the First Battle of Kernstown, Union Colonel Nathan
Marker at the Pritchard House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 28, 2007
2. Marker at the Pritchard House
The Pritchard House can be seen behind the marker.
Kimball impressed seven of Pritchardís horses to replace artillery horses killed in the battle. During the winter of 1864-1865, Major General Philip H. Sheridanís Union Army occupied the Lower Shenandoah Valley, taking crops and harvesting a valuable stand of timber from Pritchardís property to build and supply the Armyís large winter encampment near Kernstown. After the war, the Federal Government refused to reimburse the Pritchardís for their losses because Samuel Pritchard could not prove his loyalty to the United States during the war, although many former Union officers supported his effort.
 
Location. 39° 8.662′ N, 78° 11.627′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Battle Park Drive, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located at the east side of the Pritchard House, in Kernstown Battlefields and Pritchard-Grim Farm Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 610 Battle Park Drive, Winchester VA 22604, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Second Battle of Kernstown (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Battle of Kernstown (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The First Battle of Kernstown (about
The Pritchard House Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
3. The Pritchard House Today
400 feet away); a different marker also named The Second Battle of Kernstown (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The First Battle of Kernstown (about 600 feet away); Battle of Kernstown (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Kernstown (approx. 0.3 miles away); Kernstown Battles (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. A photograph of the Pritchard home from around 1890 is on the left side of the marker. A photograph of “Helen Johnston and son, Samuel Reese Pritchard,” from around 1860 is on the right side.
 
Regarding The Pritchard House. This is one of six battlefield interpretive markers in the park. See the related markers link below for a listing of the walking tour, or the Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a driving tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kernstown Battlefield Association. (Submitted on August 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Close Up View of the Photograph of the House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
4. Close Up View of the Photograph of the House

2. Second Kernstown. NPS Battle Summary (Submitted on August 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour By Markers. This marker is related to several markers in the area detailing the actions of two separate battles occurring around Kernstown during the Civil War. The sites include walking trails at the Pritchard-Grim Farm and Rose Hill. (Submitted on November 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Helen Johnston Pritchard and Son around 1860 image. Click for full size.
By Linda Walcroft, April 5, 2008
5. Helen Johnston Pritchard and Son around 1860
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,850 times since then and 93 times this year. Last updated on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on August 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 26, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on August 28, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on January 15, 2009, by Linda Walcroft of Strasburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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