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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lord Fairfax

 
 
Lord Fairfax Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. Lord Fairfax Marker
Inscription. Thomas Fairfax (1693-1781), sixth Baron Fairfax of Cameron, was the proprietor of the Northern Neck Proprietary, a vast landholding that lay between the Rappahannock and the Potomac Rivers, and extended to the Blue Ridge. Born in England, he came to Virginia about 1735 and moved to the Shenandoah Valley about 1747. He eventually lived at Greenway Court in present-day Clarke County, while managing his land-holdings. In 1749, he was named a justice of the peace for Frederick County, and also served as one of the justices of the county court of chancery that met in Winchester, and a county lieutenant for a number of years. He is buried at Christ Episcopal Church in Winchester.
 
Erected 2003 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number Q 4d.)
 
Location. 39° 12.357′ N, 78° 10.129′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Maple Street / North Frederick Pike (U.S. 522) and Autumn View Lane, on the right when traveling west on Maple Street / North Frederick Pike. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester VA 22603, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Constructing Star Fort (approx. ¼ mile away); Star Fort
Lord Fairfax Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
2. Lord Fairfax Marker
(was approx. ¼ mile away but has been reported missing. ); Third Battle of Winchester (approx. ¼ mile away); Second Battle of Winchester (approx. ¼ mile away); Civil War Earthworks (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Second Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.3 miles away); 2nd Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.8 miles away); 3rd Battle of Winchester (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced a marker with this same title and number erected in the late 1920s or early 1930s that read on the front, “By this road Thomas Lord Fairfax, proprietor of the Northern Neck of Virginia, was accustomed to pass from his home ‘Greenway Court,’ to preside over sessions of the justices’ court at Winchester, 1749-1769. His tomb is in the crypt of Christ Church, Winchester.” On the back was, “Winchester — At first called Fredericktown, it was founded in 1744, near a Shawnee Indian village, by Colonel James Wood, a native of the English city of Winchester. The town
Lord Fairfax's Final Resting Place image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
3. Lord Fairfax's Final Resting Place
was situated in Lord Fairfax’s proprietary of the Northern Neck. It was chartered in 1752.” The new marker is now past the northern limits of Winchester, in Frederick County. Some old guidebooks placed the old marker on Route 522 at the southern limits of the the city.
 
Also see . . .
1. Greenway Court. We also met with Lord Fairfax at his residence in Clarke County. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Short Biography of Lord Fairfax. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. This land is my land! All 5 million acres of it... A discussion of the Fairfax Grants. (Submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
Tablet on Top of Lord Fairfax's Tomb image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
4. Tablet on Top of Lord Fairfax's Tomb
Under this spot repost the remains
of
Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax of Cameron
Son of Thomas, Fifth Lord Fairfax
and Cathrine Culpeper, his wife.
Born at Leeds Castle, County Kent, England,
October 22, 1693,
died at his proprietary of the
Northern Neck in Virginia
December 9, 1781,
in the eighty-night year of his age.
He was buried in the original
Frederick Parish Church at the corner of
Loudoun (Main) and Boscawen (Water) Streets
whence his remains were removed
to this church in 1828;
where they were re-interred in 1925,
when this tablet was erected by the
vestry of Christ Church.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,599 times since then and 48 times this year. Last updated on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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