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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Muscogee County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning

 
 
1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
1. 1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 1
Inscription. Side 1:
In October 1918, the Infantry School of Arms was established on 80 acres of land near here. Camp Benning, later Fort Benning, was named in honor of Confederate Infantry General Lewis Benning, a Columbus resident. The camp’s first commander was Col. Henry Eames. Constructed in just 7 days, the temporary camp had some 300 tents, mess halls, offices and warehouses. It was built under the supervision Major J. Paul Jones. Hundreds of thousands of young men received their military training under the watchful eye of such legendary military leaders as Marshall, Eisenhower, Stilwell, Collins, and Patton here at the Infantry School.

Side 2:
Fort Benning's mission has always been to train infantrymen for their task of defending the nation. Fort Benning, now located south of Columbus on some 200,000 acres, is the free world’s largest infantry training facility. Fort Benning has trained infantrymen who have fought with pride in all the nation’s military involvements for more than half a century. During World War II, the Cold War, the wars in Korea, Vietnam, and Panama, as well as Desert Storm, infantrymen have fought and died to keep this nation free. This marker honors the infantrymen who have for the past 75 years trained at the Home of the Infantry.
 
Erected 1993
1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
2. 1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 2
by Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the Carl Patrick Foundation.
 
Location. 32° 28.451′ N, 84° 57.146′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Georgia, in Muscogee County. Marker is at the intersection of 15th Street and Dixon Drive, on the right when traveling east on 15th Street. Touch for map. The marker is located on 15th Street where 15th Street and Dixon Drive join together at the Macon Road intersection. Macon Road (to the east) changes names to Wynnton Road heading west at this intersection. Marker is in this post office area: Columbus GA 31901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Carson McCullers (approx. ¼ mile away); He Helped Bring And Keep Fort Benning (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wynnton School Library (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Cedars (approx. half a mile away); “Wildwood” (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Elms (approx. one mile away); Leonard Spring (approx. one mile away); Radcliff School (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbus.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Benning. Detailed information on the history and present status of Fort Benning. (Submitted on October 12, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyWar, 1st Iraq & Desert StormWar, ColdWar, KoreanWar, VietnamWar, World II
 
1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
3. 1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker, Side 2
This view is due east, taken from 15th Street. Dixon Drive is the road to the left; Georgia Highway 22 (named Macon Road to the left, and Wynnton Road to the right) is at the traffic light.
1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 25, 2009
4. 1918 Diamond Jubilee 1993 Camp Benning / Fort Benning Marker
Looking west on 15th Street. The heavily wooded lot on the left was the site of "Hilton," an antebellum mansion.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 11, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,963 times since then and 94 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 11, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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