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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wardensville in Hardy County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wardensville

 
 
Wardensville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
1. Wardensville Marker
Inscription. George Washington laid off land here for William Wallace Warden, Nov. 11, 1749. Warden built a stockade fort, near which members of his family were killed by Indians, 1758, and the fort burned. Scene of skirmishes in 1862-63.
 
Erected by West Virginia Historic Commission.
 
Location. 39° 4.803′ N, 78° 35.528′ W. Marker is in Wardensville, West Virginia, in Hardy County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 48), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located in front of the county information center and conference center. Marker is in this post office area: Wardensville WV 26851, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Wardensville (here, next to this marker); Population Center (here, next to this marker); Lost and Found (approx. 3 miles away); West Virginia / Virginia (approx. 4.2 miles away); Capon Springs (approx. 6.3 miles away); Capon Lake Whipple Truss Bridge (approx. 6.3 miles away); Oriskany Sand (approx. 7.4 miles away); Frederick County / Shenandoah County (approx. 8.9 miles away in Virginia). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wardensville.
 
Additional comments.
Markers in front of the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
2. Markers in front of the Visitor Center
1. Skirmishes around Wardensville during the Civil War

According to the Official Records the following skirmishes were recorded around the town:

- On May 7, 1862 the 3rd Maryland Potomac Home Brigade under Lt. Col. Stephen Downey clashed with Confederates posted north of town.

- Lt. Col. Downey lead cavalry into the town again on May 29, 1862, and met brief resistance.

- Skirmishes occurred on December 16 and 22, 1862 as Federal forces advanced back into the Shenandoah Valley following the Confederate Maryland Campaign of 1862.

- On March 20, 1863 Federals made a reconnaissance through the town. Another such reconnaissance, led by Col. James Galligher of the 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry, met brief resistance on April 20, 1863.

- While the town is mentioned in dispatches during the Gettysburg Campaign and the Valley Campaigns of 1864, no fighting is recorded.

- On May 10, 1864, Federal cavalry skirmished with Confederate cavalry west of town near the Lost River Gap.
    — Submitted October 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,160 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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