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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jug Bridge Monument

 
 
Jug Bridge Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 3, 2007
1. Jug Bridge Monument Marker
Very much worse for the wear!
Inscription. The stone demijohn and memorial plaque, placed by the Sons of the American Revolution, were originally located on a bridge crossing the Monocacy River about 2 miles east of this site. The stone bridge of four arches and two 65-foot spans was constructed in 1808. It collapsed on March 3, 1942. The Francis Scott Key Memorial Foundation, Inc., provided funds for relocation of these monuments.

When it was learned that French General Lafayette was planning to visit the United States in 1824, a committee of citizens invited the General to visit Frederick, since many local men had served under his command during the Revolution. Lafayette accepted. He arrived on December 24, 1824, and was met by Fredericktonians on the Monocacy Bridge just outside of town.

Among those present to greet him were the Mayor, several members of Congress, and local Revolutionary War hero Sergeant Lawrence Everhart, who had rescued Lafayette during the Battle of Brandywine. Lawrence Everhart was born in Germany in 1755, but lived most of his life in the Middletown area. He was referred to as the “bravest of the brave.”
 
Erected 1998.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 
Two Markers, Jug Bridge Memorial, and Lafayette Visit Memorial Stone image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 3, 2007
2. Two Markers, Jug Bridge Memorial, and Lafayette Visit Memorial Stone
24.306′ N, 77° 23.022′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Bowmanís Farm Road and Patrick Street, on the right when traveling east on Bowmanís Farm Road. Touch for map. Just west of the overpass of I-70 / U.S. 40. In a pull off area between the interstate, Bowman Road, and Patrick Street. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21705, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jug Bridge (here, next to this marker); General LaFayette (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lower Depot Neighborhood / The Frederick Brick Works (approx. 1.2 miles away); Gen. Bradley T. Johnson (approx. 1.3 miles away); Frederick Town Barracks (approx. 1.4 miles away); “The Great Baby Waker” (approx. 1.4 miles away); Hessian Barracks - Witness to History (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Frederick Town Barracks (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Regarding Jug Bridge Monument. Much of the marker has weathered badly. A drawing of a “Medallion designed by James Pearl, 1964” honoring the Jug Bridge is on the left side. Portraits of General Lafayette and Sergeant Lawrence Everhart are on the right.
 
Also see . . .
Jug Bridge Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 3, 2007
3. Jug Bridge Monument

1. Jug Bridge Monument. Note the inscriptions on the monument. (Submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Biography of Lafayette. Includes details of his four trips across the Atlantic to America. (Submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Lawrence Everhart's Revolutionary War. Of note, this source does not mention any interaction between Lafayette and Everhart at Brandywine, stating the two became acquainted at Yorktown, however. Regardless, the story of Lawrence's day at the Battle of Cowpens is remarkable. (Submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,659 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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