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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Langley in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Langley Fork

 
 
Langley Fork Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2007
1. Langley Fork Marker
Inscription. Two 18th-century roads intersect just west of here: Sugarlands Rolling Road (now Georgetown Pike) and Little Falls Road (now Chain Bridge Road). Several historic structures stand near the fork: Langley Toll House (ca. 1820); Langley Ordinary (ca. 1850); Mackall House (ca. 1858); Gunnell's Chapel (ca. 1879); Langley Friends Meeting House (ca. 1893), and Hickory Hill (ca. 1870), at times the home of Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson, then-Senator John F. Kennedy, and his brother Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. Thomas Lee, of Stratford Hall, acquired Langley in a 1719 land grant and named it for a family estate in England.
 
Erected 1998 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number T-33.)
 
Location. 38° 56.751′ N, 77° 9.291′ W. Marker is in Langley, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker is at the intersection of Georgetown Pike (Virginia Route 193) and Chain Bridge Road (County Route 3563), on the right when traveling west on Georgetown Pike. Touch for map. Just to the west of the entrance to Langley Fork Park. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Lean VA 22101, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Who Was Claude Moore? (approx.
Langley Fork Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Clifford, March 16, 2009
2. Langley Fork Marker
0.4 miles away); Salona (approx. 1.2 miles away); Benvenue (approx. 1.3 miles away); McLean (approx. 1.5 miles away); The Laughlin Building (approx. 1.5 miles away); William Watters (approx. 1.5 miles away); c. 1931 (approx. 1.6 miles away in Maryland); c. 1926 (approx. 1.6 miles away in Maryland).
 
Also see . . .
1. Langley Fork Historic District Photographs. (Submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Langly Fork Application for National Historic Site Registration. Details the historic buildings in the district. (Submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. A Walking Tour of Civil War-Related Sites at the Langley Fork. This post examines the historically significant buildings in Langley and their connection to the Civil War era. (Submitted on February 5, 2013, by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Gunnell's Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr., February 20, 2011
3. Gunnell's Chapel
This small wooden structure was the home of an African-American Methodist congregation. The chapel was built around 1879 on land belonging to Robert Gunnell, a black farmer in Langley. Robert became a free man prior to the war, and according to some sources, owned several slaves, including his wife. While residing in Washington City during the Civil War, Robert was paid compensation for his slaves when they were freed under the 1862 act abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia
Mackall House image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr., February 20, 2011
4. Mackall House
This building was erected in 1858-59 and served as the first home of the Trinity Methodist Church. The Mackall family converted the church into a residence at the end of the 19th century. The building today resembles more a family home than a church. During the Civil War, the church served as a hospital, like many buildings in the area. The Country Day School now occupies the spot.
Langley Ordinary image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr., June 4, 2011
5. Langley Ordinary
The Langley Ordinary (tavern) served as Union General George A. McCall's headquarters and as a wartime hospital. Graffiti of Union soldiers still dots the walls inside. According to a National Register of Historic Places application, the Langley Ordinary was built circa 1850; the Fairfax Country Inventory of Historic Sites places the date of construction between 1856-61.
Looking down Georgetown Pike towards the Crossroads image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2007
6. Looking down Georgetown Pike towards the Crossroads
Langley Fork Marker showing new pull-off area along Georgetown Pike image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr., February 3, 2013
7. Langley Fork Marker showing new pull-off area along Georgetown Pike
Langley Meeting House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2007
8. Langley Meeting House
Located at 6410 Georgetown Pike.
Langley Toll House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2007
9. Langley Toll House
At 6324 Georgetown Pike, the 19th century building was originally 1 story, and enlarged to 2 stories in 20th century.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,407 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 16, 2009, by Carl Clifford of Arlington, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on February 5, 2013, by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia.   6. submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on February 5, 2013, by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia.   8, 9. submitted on September 5, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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