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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pinopolis in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Pinopolis

 
 
Pinopolis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 29, 2009
1. Pinopolis Marker
Inscription. Plantation owners began this pineland village in 1830s to escape lowcountry plantation summer nights, thought to cause "country fever" (malaria). By 1844 Pinopolis comprised about 12 homes. The village served as a shelter for refugees during the Civil War. The post office began in 1894 with Elizabeth Ravenel as postmaster. Pinopolis has two Historic Districts listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected 1995 by Anne Sinkler Fishburne Foundation and Berkeley County Historical Society. (Marker Number 8-31.)
 
Location. 33° 13.847′ N, 80° 2.2′ W. Marker is in Pinopolis, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker is on Pinopolis Road (State Highway 8-5) north of Fishburne Drive, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1940 Pinopolis Road, Pinopolis SC 29469, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. John's Church (approx. 1.4 miles away); “Sojer Grave” (approx. 2.7 miles away); Berkeley Training High School (approx. 3.2 miles away); Old Moncks Corner (approx. 3.4
Pinopolis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 31, 2012
2. Pinopolis Marker
miles away); First Site of Moncks Corner (approx. 3.4 miles away); Stony Landing Plantation (approx. 3.4 miles away); Santee Canal (approx. 3Ĺ miles away); Dixie Training School / Berkeley Training High School (approx. 3.6 miles away).
 
Regarding Pinopolis. Pinopolis Historic District North which consists of four contributing and three non-contributing properties, includes four of the nineteenth century retreats that helped to engender Pinopolis. The vernacular houses are uniformly of frame construction and abstain from the stylistic pretensions of the permanent plantersí seats of the period in accord with their status as houses of retreat. Beginning in the late eighteenth century lowcountry planters sought respite near their plantations, in resorts like Pinopolis, from the fevers associated with the lowlands in the summer. With the decline of the planter classes after the war, many resort villages turned to commercial ventures for their livelihood, however this was not the case in Pinopolis. Preferring to preserve the quiet community atmosphere of their resort village, the residents of Pinopolis blocked several proposals that would have attracted development. This decision helped Pinopolis
Pinopolis Marker, seen at left, at the Post Office image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 29, 2009
3. Pinopolis Marker, seen at left, at the Post Office
retain its integrity as a pineland village. The buildings in the district date from ca.1834 to ca.1883 and retain in large measure their original forms and features. The districtís landscape is unified by the absence of contemporary buildings, heavy foliage, the absence of paved roads, and the cohesiveness of the four residences which are weatherboarded with large porches. The districtís properties also include some outbuildings. Listed in the National Register August 19, 1982 ,#82003834 .
(Most National Register properties are privately owned and are not open to the public. The privacy of owners should be respected. Not all properties retain the same integrity as when originally documented and listed in the National Register due to changes and modifications over time.)...S.C. Dept. of Archives and History


Pinopolis Historic District South,
which contains thirteen properties, consists of the historic core of the planters retreat community of Pinopolis. The district contains numerous early to middle nineteenth century summer houses, the Gothic Revival influenced Pinopolis Methodist Church (ca.1900), and other later nineteenth century buildings. The buildings of the Pinopolis Historic District South are representative of the development of vernacular building forms and construction technology of the nineteenth century. The absence of stylistic pretensions in
Pinopolis Marker and Post Office...2012 look image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 31, 2012
4. Pinopolis Marker and Post Office...2012 look
most of the buildings is typical of pineland village architecture. Beginning in the late eighteenth century lowcountry planters sought respite near their plantations, in resorts like Pinopolis, from the fevers associated with the lowlands in the summer. With the decline of the planter classes after the war, many resort villages turned to commercial ventures for their livelihood, however this was not the case in Pinopolis. Preferring to preserve the quiet community atmosphere of their village, the residents of Pinopolis blocked several proposals that would have attracted development. This decision helped Pinopolis retain its integrity as a pineland village. The districtís properties also include some outbuildings. Listed in the National Register August 19, 1982.,#82003835
(Most National Register properties are privately owned and are not open to the public. The privacy of owners should be respected. Not all properties retain the same integrity as when originally documented and listed in the National Register due to changes and modifications over time.)...S.C. Dept. of Archives and History
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Pinopolis Marker, looking south on Pinopolis Road (State Road 8-5) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 31, 2012
5. Pinopolis Marker, looking south on Pinopolis Road (State Road 8-5)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 18, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 826 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 18, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on June 1, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on October 18, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on June 1, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Pictures of the contributing properties and retreats within each of the two historical districts. • Can you help?
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