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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mount Holly in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Medway Plantation

 
 
Medway Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. Medway Plantation Marker
Inscription. In 1686 Medway Plantation was granted by the Lords Proprietors to Jan Van Arrsen,seigneur de Weirnhoudt. In 1689 the property came into the possession of Landgrave Thomas Smith, Governor of South Carolina November 1693 to October 1694. He died in November 1694 and is buried at Medway.
 
Erected 1965 by Replacing Marker Destroyed. (Marker Number 8-19.)
 
Location. 33° 2.242′ N, 80° 2.014′ W. Marker is in Mount Holly, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 52 and Medway Road (State Highway 8-667), on the right when traveling north on U.S. 52. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Goose Creek SC 29445, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Thorogood Plantation / Mount Holly Plantation (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mount Holly Station • Mount Holly (approx. 0.6 miles away); Early Indian Trading Paths / The Goose Creek Men (approx. 0.7 miles away); Springfield Plantation (approx. one mile away); Casey (Caice) (approx. 1.3 miles away); St. James, Goose Creek Chapel of Ease / Bethlehem Baptist Church
Medway Plantation Marker, looking north along US 52 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 4, 2009
2. Medway Plantation Marker, looking north along US 52
(approx. 2.3 miles away); Button Hall (approx. 2.4 miles away); Goose Creek / City of Goose Creek (approx. 2.7 miles away).
 
Regarding Medway Plantation. Medway, built in 1686, only sixteen years after the founding of the colony, and at the time of the nomination was considered the oldest house in South Carolina of record, is in plan and situation typical of the plantation houses to be built in the lowcountry for the next hundred years. (Note: research since the time of nomination has established that the core of the present house at Medway Plantation was built in 1704-1705 by Edward and Elizabeth Hyrne. The house assumed its present arrangement by 1875.) Originating at Medway was the Janus-like scheme, which provides for the house facing both ways with both a river prospect and a landside entrance, a situation common to the region. The house is thought to have been built by Jan Van Arrsens, Seigneur de Weirnhoudt, who led a small company of Hollanders to Carolina. Dutch architecture is most obvious in the stepped gables of the original house, and the influence of Van Arrsen’s architecture has kept the house looking as though it had as good a right to be standing over a canal in the low countries of Holland as beside rice fields in the lowcountry of Carolina. The
Medway Plantation Marker, as seen at Medway Road (State Road 8-667) along US 52 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 4, 2009
3. Medway Plantation Marker, as seen at Medway Road (State Road 8-667) along US 52
second story added to the original building copied its stepped gables. In the 19th century Medway enjoyed a sound economic mixture of agriculture and industry by making rice while the weather was hot and brick when it was cold. Brick making was so successful that Medway owner Peter Gaillard Stoney sent thousands of bricks down for the building of Fort Sumter. Additionally, after World War II, the “Medway Plan” was developed here for American cities to adopt and help rehabilitate French towns. Several graves in a small cemetery are also located on the property. Listed in the National Register July 16, 1970. (South Carolina Dept. Of Archives and History)
 
Also see . . .
1. South Carolina Plantations. Medway Plantation (Submitted on October 20, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Medway Plantation, Wikipedia entry. Jan Van Arrsens, the Seigneur of Wernhaut (also "Weirnhoudt"), led a small group of settlers from Holland to the province of Carolina around 1686. (Submitted on October 20, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
Medway Plantation image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives & History, circa 1970
4. Medway Plantation
National Register of Historic Places : Medway *** (added 1970 - Building - #70000569) • Also known as Jan Van Arrsen's House • E of Mount Holly off U.S. 52, Mount Holly • Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering, Person, Information Potential • Architect, builder, or engineer: Van Arrsens,Jan • Architectural Style: No Style Listed • Historic Person: Smith,Thomas,et al. • Significant Year: 1886, 1686 • Area of Significance: Architecture, Industry, Agriculture, Historic - Non-Aboriginal, Literature, Politics/Government, Landscape Architecture • Cultural Affiliation: Dutch Colonial Settlement • Period of Significance: 1650-1699, 1875-1899 • Owner: Private • Historic Function: Domestic • Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling
Medway Plantation Marker image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives & History, circa 1970
5. Medway Plantation Marker
Medway Plantation image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives & History, circa 1970
6. Medway Plantation
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 20, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,962 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 20, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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