Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Stephenson in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Jordan Springs

Healing Springs

 
 
Jordan Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. Jordan Springs Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, both United States and Confederate forces used Jordan Springs resort as a hospital at different times. Wounded and sick Confederate soldiers from the Antietam and Gettysburg battlefields came to the springs—although Martinsburg, W.Va., was closer—because Confederate sympathies were stronger here. When soldiers died, they were buried on the resort grounds, and in 1866, their remains were reinterred in the Stonewall Cemetery in Winchester.

The resort suspended normal operations during the war. Confederate Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson stopped here for directions to Stephenson Depot during the Second Battle of Winchester, June 14-15, 1863. Johnson had been ordered there to block Union Gen. Robert Milroy’s retreat from Winchester. Members of the Jordan family, strong Confederate sympathizers, guided the Confederates to the bridge over the tracks at Stephenson Depot. Johnson’s men reached the bridge in the predawn darkness, just in time to hold it against the retreating Federals. About 100 men were killed and wounded, and about 4,000 Union soldiers surrendered, the largest Federal capitulation of the war to that point. Afterward, the Confederate officers rode back to Jordan Springs for breakfast.

(Sidebar): Branch Jordan opened the original White Sulfur Springs Resort here
Close Up View of the 1917 Photograph image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
2. Close Up View of the 1917 Photograph
early in the 1800s; Virginia Indians had used the healing springs for generations. In 1855, Edwin C. Jordan, a nephew of Branch Jordan, opened the second, larger hotel. It burned in 1888, and the present hotel opened in 1894.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 12.923′ N, 78° 5.033′ W. Marker is near Stephenson, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is on Jordan Springs Road (County Route 664), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in front of the present day resort. Marker is in this post office area: Stephenson VA 22656, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stephenson Depot ( approx. 1.7 miles away); Third Battle of Winchester (was approx. 1.7 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Action at Stephenson’s Depot ( approx. 2 miles away); The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester
The Marker is a Leap Across the Creek from the Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
3. The Marker is a Leap Across the Creek from the Road
( approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 2.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stephenson.
 
More about this marker. The marker displays a photograph of the Jordan Springs Resort, circa 1917. Portraits of Gens. Edward Johnson and Robert Milroy are on the right side.
 
Also see . . .  General James A. Walker's Report. General Walker lead the Stonewall Brigade, part of General Johnson’s command. General Walker’s report from June 25, 1863 mentions the movement through Jordan Springs and the action described on the marker. (Submitted on September 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Present Day View of Jordan Springs image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
4. Present Day View of Jordan Springs
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,835 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement