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Bement in Piatt County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Bement Connection

 

óLooking for Lincoln ó

 
Top Section - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
1. Top Section - - The Bement Connection Marker
(Click on any of these photos to see the details.)
Inscription. A pocket watch is meant to be used with a chain. Three styles were popular: T-bar, which slips through a vest buttonhole; spring ring, which attaches to a belt loop; and fob. Lincolnís pocket watch shown here has a shorter style chain, featuring a decorative fob on the end, allowing it to simply hang from the pocket freely, while the other end of the chain attaches to a small ring at the top of the watch for easy retrieval. Abraham Lincolnís pocket watch, with chain and fob, was inherited by his son Robert.

Abraham Lincoln passed through Bement regularly during the years he practiced law on the old Eighth Judicial Circuit and while he was campaigning in the 1850's. On one trip, he lost his gold watch. It was found near the livery by young Fannie Fristoe Scott on her way to school. When Fannie showed the watch to the livery man, he suggested it was Mr. Lincolnís. Fannie gave the livery man the watch, and he returned it to Lincoln. Fannie received a nice letter from Lincoln, thanking her for finding his watch. His last trip through here was on Monday February 11, 1861, en route to Washington, D. C. The train sped through Bement, passing through a corridor of well-wishers. As the train rushed into the countryside, the brakeman, Thomas Ross, was surprised to see a man standing with a shotgun at a trestle. This volunteer
Close-up Photo - - Abraham Lincoln's Pocket Watch image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
2. Close-up Photo - - Abraham Lincoln's Pocket Watch
guard presented arms as the train passed by. He was carrying out the self-appointed task of seeing that the Presidentís train got over the trestle safely. Who was this unsung hero? In the words of Clay Whig, Chicago Daily Tribune, it was one of the “sturdy yeomanry of Piatt County”.

Abraham Lincoln received threatening letters the minute the results of the presidential election were official. His enemies openly bragged that “Old Abe” should never be inaugurated as President of the United States. While traveling toward the capitol in February, whispers of Lincolnís assassination were rampant. Rumors suggested he would meet his end at Baltimore, where secessionists were waiting to kill him. Detective Allan Pinkerton confirmed the assassination plot, urging Lincoln to avoid Baltimore completely. Although Lincoln was unconvinced, his travel plans were adjusted; the President-elect slipped away accompanied by Ward Hill Lamon and Mr. Pinkerton. In a soft hat and old overcoat, he boarded a special train, arriving safely in the Capital.
 
Erected 2009 by Central Illinois Manufacturing Company.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Looking for Lincoln marker series.
 
Location. 39° 55.406′ N, 88° 
Middle Section - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
3. Middle Section - - The Bement Connection Marker
34.312′ W. Marker is in Bement, Illinois, in Piatt County. Marker is on East Wilson Street east of North Macon Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Easy to see from East Wilson Street - located on the East lawn of the "Bryant Cottage" (home), Francis & Sarah Bryant, Illinois State Historic Site in Bement. Marker is in this post office area: Bement IL 61813, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bement Goes to War (a few steps from this marker); Douglas - Lincoln Debates (a few steps from this marker); Bryant Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); Lincoln - Douglas (approx. 5.8 miles away); Lincoln in Monticello (approx. 7 miles away); Piatt County Veterans Memorial (approx. 7 miles away); Abraham Lincoln - Eighth Judicial District (approx. 7 miles away); Monticello Journeys (approx. 7.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bement.
 
Also see . . .
1. Travel with Lincoln ::. Climb into Lincolnís buggy and take a trip with Lincoln and his fellow lawyers on the job traveling Illinois as Circuit Lawyers. See all the Lincoln Circuit Markers (and a surprise or two), in the order of his travels while a member of the Circuit of the Eighth Judicial District (of Illinois) during 1847-1857. Use the “First >>”
Bottom Section - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
4. Bottom Section - - The Bement Connection Marker
button in the upper right to see these markers in sequence, starting from Springfield. (Submitted on October 31, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

2. Looking for Lincoln::. Many resources for the Tracking of Lincoln through History and Illinois. Aimed at all ages. (Submitted on October 31, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

3. Looking for Lincoln Video - on P. B. S. Follow Henry Louis Gates, Jr. "...from Illinois, to Gettysburg, to Washington, D. C., and face to face with people who live with Lincoln every day..." (Submitted on October 31, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable Persons
 
Close-up Photo - - Drawing on Marker - - - 'Standing Guard' image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
5. Close-up Photo - - Drawing on Marker - - - 'Standing Guard'
Close-up Photo - - "Time Card" Great Western Railroad image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
6. Close-up Photo - - "Time Card" Great Western Railroad
This "Time Card" was for the "President-Elect Special Train" that carried Abraham Lincoln from Springfield, Illinois to "State Line City", Indiana. The entire trip to Washington, D. C. for his Inauguration as President of the United States in 1861 involved: 1,904 miles, 18 railroad companies, and used at least 24 steam locomotives.
Looking North - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
7. Looking North - - The Bement Connection Marker
Marker Brick Walk-way - - Reclaimed Brick - Village of Bement image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
8. Marker Brick Walk-way - - Reclaimed Brick - Village of Bement
Long View - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
9. Long View - - The Bement Connection Marker
The marker can be seen in the lower left of this photo.
Full View - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf
10. Full View - - The Bement Connection Marker
"P.O.I." - Path of Information - Tom Kinsella - 2009 image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
11. "P.O.I." - Path of Information - Tom Kinsella - 2009
This marker is on the path-way called the "P.O.I." at the Bement location.
Looking East - - The Bement Connection Marker image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
12. Looking East - - The Bement Connection Marker
Francis & Sarah Bryant - Cottage (Home) Illinois State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Al Wolf, October 28, 2009
13. Francis & Sarah Bryant - Cottage (Home) Illinois State Historic Site
The marker is on the lawn to the right of the Bryant's home. - - > > >
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 31, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. This page has been viewed 1,098 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on October 31, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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